Bexhill Photographers (J-P)

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Professional Photographers in Bexhill ( J- P )

 Joseph William Jacklett   - J. J. Jarrett - J. W. Jarrett -  Miss M. Jarrett - J. J. Payne - J. Perry - Arthur Bruges Plummer

Joseph William Jacklett  and the Family of Photographers named Jacklett, Jackolett and Jacolette

Recounting the story of the Bexhill photographer Joseph William Jacklett presents some difficulties as there were three photographers called Joseph Jacklett who were active during the period 1850-1910. This trio of photographers represented three generations of the same family. The eldest was Joseph Jacklett (1826-1892), a veteran itinerant photographer who started his working life under the name of Jacolette or Jackolett and ended his photographic career at a permanent studio in Aldershot. The next Jacklett photographer was Joseph William Jacklett (1856-1884), the second son of Joseph Jacklett senior. Born in Dublin, Ireland, around 1856, Joseph William Jacklett worked as a photographer in Aldershot at the same time as his father, but his photographic career was brought to a tragic end when he died at the age of 28 after a bizarre accident involving exploding dynamite. Joseph William Jacklett (1884-1926), the son of the unfortunate Joseph William Jacklett, began his photographic career in Bexhill, but he, too, also worked as a photographer in Aldershot. To confuse matters even further, Mrs Ellen (Helen) Jacklette (1852-1932), the widow of Joseph William Jacklett and mother of Joseph William Jacklett continued her late husband's photography business in Aldershot under the name of (Mrs) J. W. Jacklett. Both Joseph William Jacklett (1856-1884) and his son Joseph William Jacklett (1884-1926) were referred to as Joseph William Jacklett junior, so they will be identified in this account by the colour of the typeface.

          Joseph Jacklett (1826-1892)   = Elizabeth Martin (born c1829, Aberdeen, Scotland)

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                  Joseph William Jacklett (1856-1884)  =  Ellen (Helen) Voller (born 1852, Hants)

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                                                  Joseph William Jacklett (1884-1926) = Bertha Duke (born1876)

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(1) Nellie Frances Jacklett (born 1908, Aldershot) --- (2) Josephine Wilfreda Jacklett (born1911,Wales) 
 

[ABOVE] A simplified Jacklett Family Tree showing the relationship between the three professional photographers named Joseph Jacklett.

 
Joseph William JACKLETT (1884-1926)

Joseph William Jacklett  was born in Aldershot, Hampshire in 1884 [birth registered in the Farnham District of Hampshire during the 2nd Quarter of 1884]. Joseph was the son of Joseph William Jacklett (born c1856, Dublin, Ireland) and Ellen Voller (born 1852, Bramshott, Hampshire). Joseph's father Joseph William Jacklett, was the son of Joseph Jacklett (born c1826 Bristol - died 1892, Aldershot) a veteran professional photographer who operated a successful photographic portrait studio in the army garrison town of Aldershot between 1875 and 1892.

Joseph William Jacklett had established a photographic portrait studio at 160 Victoria Road, Aldershot in the same garrison town as his father. In December 1884, when Joseph junior was less than 6 months old, his father Joseph William Jacklett died at the age of 28, following an explosion at a hotel. Mrs Ellen Jacklett, Joseph junior's widowed mother, took over the running of her late husband's studio at 160 Victoria Road, Aldershot. Mrs Ellen Jacklett ran her late husband's  photographic studio in Victoria Road until around 1907. Presumably, as Joseph William Jacklett entered his teenage years, he assisted his mother in her Aldershot photographic studio. However, Mrs Jacklett, who had previously worked as a cook and had only the briefest introduction to photography during her short marriage to Joseph's father, evidently believed her son would benefit from an apprenticeship with an experienced professional photographer.

In June 1898, the London photographer William Morris Crouch (born 1847, Binfield, Berkshire) who had recently established The Sackville Photographic Studio at 7 Sea Road, Bexhill-on-Sea, placed the following advertisement in the local press :

PHOTOGRAPHY. - Well educated YOUTH required as ARTICLED PUPIL. Exceptional opportunity for rapid advancement in every branch of high class work under personal instruction of the principal. - Apply, SACKVILLE STUDIO, 7 Sea Road, Bexhill-on-Sea.
 
[ABOVE] The text of a notice placed by William Crouch in the "Situation Vacant" columns of the Bexhill Chronicle on 10th June 1898. Some months earlier, William Crouch had established The Sackville Photographic Studio at 7 Sea road, Bexhill-on-Sea and he was now requiring assistants. The advertisement was seeking an "articled pupil" or photographer's apprentice and promised an "exceptional opportunity for rapid advancement in every branch of high class work under personal instruction of the principal (i.e. William Morris Crouch)".
 
Fourteen year old Joseph William Jacklett was one of two apprentices taken on by William Morris Crouch at his photographic studio in Bexhill-on-Sea. The other photographer's apprentice was Percy William Short  (born 1884, Stonebridge, Hackney, London), the youngest son of widow Mrs Alice Short (born c1855, Somerset), a Lodging House Keeper of Brighton. A third employee at the Sackville Studio was Bertha Duke (born 1876, Chiddingstone, Kent). Miss Duke became William Crouch's chief assistant at the Sackville Studio. By January 1903, William Crouch had left Bexhill-on-Sea and the photographic studio at 7 Sea Road was being operated by Miss Duke and nineteen year old Joseph Jacklett.
 

[ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait of Paul Hodgkinson (1866-1942),  photographed at William Morris Crouch's Sackville Studio at 7 Sea Road, Bexhill-on-Sea around 1900. When this portrait was taken, Joseph Jacklett was working as a photographer alongside William Crouch.

 
 
[ABOVE] The trade plate of the Sackville Studio at 7 Sea Road, Bexhill-on-Sea, taken from a cabinet photograph.
 
 
[ABOVE] A photograph of Sea Road, Bexhill-on-Sea, taken around 1923. The third building in the parade of shops on the left was the site of William Morris Crouch's photographic studio, where the teenage Joseph Jacklett served his apprenticeship as a photographer. The brick wall on the extreme right of the picture marks the perimeter of Bexhill Railway Station's forecourt.
 
 
[ABOVE] The parade of shops and businesses in Sea Road situated opposite Bexhill Railway Station (2008). The light-grey slab in the right-hand bottom corner marks the  forecourt of the railway station. In this modern photograph, the fourth building along with the square leaded windows ( The Royal Sovereign public house) was where William Morris Crouch's Sackville Studio was situated between 1898 and 1903.
 

1901 Census : 7 Sea Road, Bexhill-on-Sea, Sussex

NAME

 

 

OCCUPATION

AGE

PLACE OF BIRTH

William M. Crouch

Head

married

Photographer (own account)

55

Binfield, Berkshire
Bertha Duke

boarder

single

Assistant

25

Penshurst, Kent
Percy Wm. Short boarder

single

Apprentice to Photographer

16

Stonebridge, London
Joseph W. Jacklet (Jacklett)

boarder

single

Apprentice to Photographer

16

Aldershot, Hampshire
[ABOVE] Extract from the 1901 census of Bexhill showing details of the photographer William Crouch's three employees boarding at 7 Sea Road. Joseph Jacklett was one of two apprentices employed at William Crouch's Sackville Studio.
 

[ABOVE] The trade plate of the Sackville Studio at 7 Sea Road, Bexhill-on-Sea, taken from a carte-de-visite photograph (c1900)

[ABOVE] Two notices placed by William Crouch in the "Situation Vacant" columns of the Bexhill Chronicle on 10th June 1898. The advertisement was seeking an "articled pupil" or photographer's apprentice and a well educated young lady who was "required to learn reception room duties" and be trained in "high class retouching and finishing" in the production of monochrome photographs. Joseph Jacklett became one of Crouch's apprentices. Bertha Duke would have responded to a similar advertisement before she was appointed as William Crouch's chief assistant at the Sackville Studio in Bexhill-on-Sea.
 

[ABOVE] A portrait of Jessie Asher Tavener (1870-1970), a cabinet photograph taken at William Morris Crouch's Sackville Studio at 7 Sea Road, Bexhill-on-Sea around 1900. Jessie Asher Tavener was born in London on 25th September 1870, the daughter of Jane and Charles Tavener, a successful builder. This studio photograph was probably taken to mark Miss Tavener's engagement to Mr Paul Hodgkinson, the proprietor of an Ironmongery business in Bexhill-on-Sea. (See carte-de-visite portrait of  Paul Hodgkinson in the illustration in the first panel).

[PHOTO: Courtesy of Jeremy Hodgkinson]

Miss Bertha Duke (1876-1917)

Bertha Duke was born in Chiddingstone, near Penshurst, Kent in 1876, the daughter of Frances Woodhams and John Duke, a manufacturer of cricket balls and cricket bats. [The birth of Bertha Duke was registered in the Sevenoaks District of Kent during the 2nd Quarter of 1876].

When Bertha Duke was in her early twenties she applied for a position at William Morris Crouch's Sackville Studio in Sea Road, Bexhill-on-Sea. To begin with, William Crouch employed Miss Duke as a Receptionist at his Bexhill studio. In addition to her reception room duties, Bertha was trained to retouch negatives and "finish" the black & white photographs produced at Crouch's Sackville Studio. By the time the 1901 census was taken, twenty-five year old Miss Duke had become William Crouch's chief assistant at his business premises in Sea Road. The 1901 census records Miss Bertha Duke as a twenty-five year old "Assistant" to William Crouch, the studio proprietor. Boarding alongside Miss Bertha Duke at 7 Sea Road in 1901 were William Crouch's two apprentices, Joseph William Jacklett  and Percy Short, both 16 years of age at the time of the census.

Miss Duke and Joseph Jacklett take over the Sackville Studio in Bexhill

Since establishing the Sackville Studio in Bexhill-on-Sea in 1898, William Morris Crouch had struggled financially. By the Summer of 1901, outstanding debts at the Sackville Studio totalled over 25. Given William Crouch's past and future record as an employer, it is likely that by the end of the following year he owed wages to his three assistants at the Sackville Studio.

By the end of December 1902, William Morris Crouch had vacated his studio at Bexhill-on Sea, probably to escape his creditors. By January 1903, Crouch had set up a new photography business in London under an assumed name ("Morris Beethoven"). Crouch's former photographic studio in Bexhill-on-Sea was left in the hands of Miss Bertha Duke, then aged around twenty-six, and Crouch's former apprentice, eighteen year old Joseph William Jacklett.

[ABOVE] The trade plate of  "J. W. Jacklette" of The Sackville Studio, 7 Sea Road, Bexhill-on-Sea, featuring a variation of the name of  Joseph William Jacklett, the young photographer who operated the studio with Miss Bertha Duke between 1903 and 1905.

Mrs Ellen Jacklett purchases the Sackville Studio in Bexhill

From 1903 to about 1905, the studio at 7 Sea Road, Bexhill-on-Sea was run by Crouch's two former employees. From the entries in local trade directories it is not clear who was actually in charge of the Sackville Studio during this period.  A trade directory of 1904 lists the proprietor of the studio as "Miss W. J. Jacklette" and the Manageress as "Miss Duke". Other trade directories give details of the studio as "Mrs Jacklette, 7 Sea Road, Bexhill-on-Sea. Between 1898 and 1906, Joseph's mother Mrs Ellen Jacklett (Sometimes referred to as Mrs J. W. Jacklett) owned a successful studio at 160 Victoria Road, Aldershot. In January 1903, Mrs Ellen Jacklett purchased the studio in Sea Road, Bexhill, on her son's behalf . "Miss W. J. Jacklette" could be a reference to Miss Duke, who was now co-habiting with Joseph William Jacklett at 7 Sea Road. There was a relationship between Miss Duke and the young photographer, but the couple did not marry until 1908, when Bertha was thirty-one and Joseph was nearly twenty-four. It is possible that because Miss Duke had been William Crouch's assistant before he escaped to London and was eight years older than the teenage apprentice, it was Bertha who was effectively in charge of the Sackville Studio in 1903. However, the name that appeared above the studio address on the photographs that were produced at the Sackville Studio between 1903 and 1905 was "J. W. Jacklette", a slightly modified version of the name of Miss Duke's partner Joseph William Jacklett. The name of Jacklett or Jacklette had been associated with photography since the early 1850s, and it probably made commercial sense to place a well-established name on the photographic mounts and in the publicity for the studio. It appears that Mrs Ellen Jacklett, Joseph's mother, had cleared the debts of the Sackville Studio and bankrolled the new photography business, so she probably insisted that her teenage son's name appeared prominently on the studio's trade plate and publicity.

[ABOVE] A photograph of the concourse at Bexhill Railway Station in Sea Road, taken from a picture postcard produced around 1910. The Sackville Photographic Studio at No.7 Sea Road would have been located just beyond the "CIGARS" shop sign on the right hand side of the picture.

 

 

[ABOVE] A studio portrait of Paul Hodgkinson and his wife Jessie Tavener, photographed at The Sackville Studio, 7 Sea Road, Bexhill-on-Sea around 1903, when Joseph William Jacklett  and Miss Bertha Duke were running the studio. The name of the studio proprietor is given as J. W. Jacklette, yet Miss Duke was probably as equally active in the business. The subject of this studio portrait is Mr & Mrs Hodgkinson of Bexhill-on-Sea. Paul Hodgkinson (1866-1942), was the owner of an Ironmongery business in Bexhill-on-Sea. Paul Hodgkinson's wife Jessie was the daughter of Jane and Charles Tavener, a successful builder based in North London..

[PHOTO: Courtesy of Jeremy Hodgkinson]

[ABOVE] A studio portrait of John and Muriel Hodgkinson, the first two children born to Paul and Jessie Hodgkinson (see couple on the right), photographed around 1903 at J. W. Jacklette's Sackville Studio, 7 Sea Road, Bexhill-on-Sea. Muriel Joyce Hodgkinson, the couple's eldest child was born in Bexhill during the 3rd Quarter of 1901. Their next child, John Tavener Hodgkinson, was born during the 4th Quarter of 1902. Mr & Mrs Hodgkinson went on to have three more children - Paul Allan Hodgkinson (born 1905), Jessie Mildred Hodgkinson (born 1908) and Bernard Spencer Hodgkinson (born 1911).

[PHOTO: Courtesy of Jeremy Hodgkinson]

 

Mrs Ellen Jacklett trading as "J. W. Jacklette" in Bexhill-on-Sea

From January 1903 to April 1905, the studio at 7 Sea Road, Bexhill-on-Sea was owned by Mrs Ellen Jacklett and operated by William Morris Crouch's two former employees -  Joseph William Jacklett, (Mrs Ellen Jacklett's son) and Miss Bertha Duke. A local trade directory published in 1904 lists Miss Duke as the "Manageress" of the Sackville Studio in Sea Road. Other trade directories lists the proprietor of the photographic studio in Sea Road as Mrs W. J. Jacklette, the mother of the young photographer Joseph William Jacklett. Joseph's mother Mrs Ellen Jacklett (Sometimes referred to as Mrs J. W. Jacklett) had been running a successful studio in Victoria Road, Aldershot, since her husband's tragic death in 1884.(Joseph William Jacklett had died following an explosion of dynamite at an Aldershot hotel in December 1884).

[ABOVE] The trade plate of  "J. W. Jacklette" of The Sackville Studio, 7 Sea Road, Bexhill-on-Sea. Between 1903 and 1905, the Sackville Studio in Bexhill-on-Sea was owned by Mrs Ellen Jacklett of Aldershot. By 1904, the studio was being managed by Mrs Jacklett's 20 year old son, Joseph William Jacklett.

The photographic portraits which were produced at the Sackville Studio in Sea Road, Bexhill-on-Sea between 1903 and 1905 were printed with the name "J. W. Jacklette", a slightly modified version of the  name of Mrs Jacklett's son, Joseph William Jacklett, the young photographer who helped manage the Bexhill studio during this period

Mrs Jacklett's studio in Bexhill-on-Sea did not prosper. Between July 1904 and April 1905, the Sackville Studio at 7 Sea Road, Bexhill-on-Sea, which was managed by Mrs Jacklett's son Joseph William Jacklett, made losses amounting to 296. By April 1905, Mrs Jacklett was insolvent and she was obliged to close the studio she owned in Bexhill-on-Sea. Mrs Jacklett's photography business in Aldershot also failed. At a hearing in the offices of the Official Receiver in York Road, Lambeth, held in August 1906, Mrs Ellen Jacklett declared that her photography business had failed because of a bout of ill-health and "through bad trade at Bexhill". At the meeting of her creditors in August 1906, Mrs Ellen Jacklett admitted that she had "not taken steps to ascertain her financial position during the past three years" and had only become aware that she "was in a state of insolvency" when she closed her Bexhill studio in April 1905.

 

 

 

Thanks to Paul Green for alerting me to the newspaper report in the Bexhill Observer (dated 11th August, 1906), which detailed the business failure of Mrs Ellen Jacklett of Aldershot, a photographer who traded under the name of J. W. Jacklett at 7 Sea road, Bexhill-on-Sea, between 1903 and 1905.

[ABOVE] A newspaper report published the Bexhill Observer on 11th August 1906, detailing how Mrs Ellen Jacklett's photographic business failed because of the poor returns from the studio she owned at 7 Sea Road, Bexhill-on-Sea. [Bexhill Observer, 11th August 1906, page 9].

 

The Family Background of Miss Bertha Duke

 

Bertha Duke's Family

1881 Census : Causeway Cottage, Chiddingstone, Kent

NAME

 

AGE

OCCUPATION

LIFE DATES

PLACE OF BIRTH

John Duke

Father

50

Cricket Bat & Ball Manufacturer (1881)

b 1830 - d 1890

Penshurst, Kent
Frances Duke

Mother

46   b 1834 - d 1893 Penshurst, Kent
Timothy Duke son 22

Farmer (1881) Cricket Bat & Ball Maker (1901)

b 1858 - d 1916 Penshurst, Kent
John Duke son 20 Apartment House Owner  in Bournemouth (1901) born 1860 Penshurst, Kent
Harry Duke son

19

Athletic Goods  Manufacturer (1901)

b1862 - d 1924

Penshurst, Kent
Fanny Duke

 daughter

16

 

born 1865

Penshurst, Kent
Bertha Duke daughter 5

Photographer (1901)

b 1876 - d 1917

Chiddingstone, Kent
Edith Duke daughter 3

 

born 1877

Chiddingstone, Kent
William H. Duke

nephew

26

Cricket Goods Manufacturer (1901)

b 1855 - d 1913

Penshurst, Kent

[ABOVE] Details of the Duke Family of Penshurst and Chiddingsrone, Kent, extracted from the 1881 census. Also shown, are the occupations taken up by John Duke's children, as recorded in the 1901 census. Three of John Duke's sons followed him into the sports equipment business, but his daughter Bertha Duke pursued a career in photography.

[ABOVE] A portrait of  the 19th century cricketer George Parr (1826-1891), a contemporary of John Duke, painted by William Bromley around 1850. Duke & Son, the firm run in the 1850s by John Duke and his father, Timothy Duke, manufactured several of the cricket items featured in this painting - cricket bat, stumps, leg-guards (pads) and shoes with spiked-soles.

[ABOVE] A box of six cricket balls manufactured by the firm of Duke & Son. This well-known firm was probably the first to produce six-seam cricket balls.
Bertha Duke's Family and the firm of Duke & Son

Bertha Duke was the fifth of six surviving children born to Frances and John Duke, a leading manufacturer of cricket balls and bats.

John Duke was born at Penshurst, Kent, on 24th August 1830. John Duke was the son of Timothy Duke of Penshurst, a first class cricketer and a well-known manufacturer of cricket equipment. The firm of Duke & Son had been making cricket bats and balls in the Penshurst area since Richard Duke founded the business in 1760. The Post Office Directory of Kent issued for the year 1855, mentions "an extensive cricket bat and ball manufactory at Penshurst" and lists Duke & Son as "manufacturers of cricket bats, balls, stumps, leg-guards, gauntlets, tubular India-rubber gloves, spiked soles &c."

A keen cricketer, John Duke played in a first class cricket match for Kent County Cricket Club in 1855. Primarily a bowler, at this county level match John Duke took 3 wickets for 26 runs. In 1857, John Duke married Frances Woodhams (born 1834, Penshurst, Kent) at St George's, Southwark. When his father died in 1858, John Duke took a more active role in the firm of Duke & Son.

By 1860, the cricket bat & ball factory was located at Chiddingstone Causeway, near Penshurst Railway Station. John Duke and his family resided at Causeway Cottage, Chiddingstone, close to Chiddingstone Causeway where the firm of Duke & Son manufactured the cricket equipment. The 1881 census records John Duke, his wife Frances and their six children at Causeway Cottage, Chiddingstone. John Duke is described on the 1881 census return as "Cricket Ball & Bat Maker, employing 72 men and 1 boy".

John Duke died at the age of sixty at Penshurst, Kent, on 7th November 1890.

After John Duke's death, the firm of Duke & Son continued under the control of his sons, Timothy Duke (1858-1916) and Harry Duke (1862-1924). By 1903, Duke & Son of Penshurst were supplying footballs, hockey sticks, dumb-bells and skittles as well as their renowned cricket gear. The Duke family owned the sports equipment factory at Chiddingstone Causeway until 1920. The Duke & Son factory continued at Chiddingstone Causeway until 1978, when the new owners transferred the business to a different location.

The company that owns the "Duke & Son" brand still supplies cricket equipment today. For instance, "Duke's Special County Grade 1 Cricket Balls" were used in the 2009 Ashes Cricket Series.

 

Joseph William Jacklett's Parents

Joseph William Jacklett (1856-1884)

Joseph William Jacklett, the father of Joseph William Jacklett (1884-1926), was born in Dublin, Ireland around 1856. Joseph William Jacklett's father, Joseph Jacklett (1826-1892), who originated from the West Country of England, was an itinerant photographer, who, before arriving in Dublin, had travelled around Wales and Lancashire with his camera. It was during his stay  Manchester, that Joseph Jacklett married Elizabeth Martin (born c1829, Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland), the mother of his son John Martin Jacolette. From Manchester, Joseph Jacklett, together with his wife Elizabeth and their young son, travelled to a Lancashire port and took a ship to Cork in Southern Ireland. After taking likenesses in the Irish seaport during December 1853, Joseph Jacklett (who at this time went under the name of Jacolette or Jackolett) journeyed north to Dublin. It as during their stay in Dublin, that Joseph Jackolett's wife Elizabeth gave birth to three further children - Joseph William Jackolett (Jacklett), who was born around 1856, his younger sister Elizabeth Jackolett (Jacklett), who arrived a year or so later, and Sarah Jacklett, who was born around 1859, but died before her 6th birthday.

As his father worked as a travelling photographer, Joseph William Jacklett's early years were spent moving from one place to another. Between 1859 and 1861, the Jackolett (Jacklett) family were in the Yorkshire town of Leeds, but by the Autumn of 1862, they had arrived in Bolton, Lancashire, where Joseph William Jacklett's sister Isabella Jackolett (Jacklett) was born during the 3rd Quarter of 1862.  The years between 1864 and 1870 were relatively stable as Joseph's father tried to make a living form a permanent photographic studio in Northampton. In 1864, Joseph gained another sister with the birth of Jane Jackolett (Jacklett). After six years in Northampton, the Jacklett family were on the move again, this time in Europe. Joseph's youngest sister Sarah Jackolett (Jacklett) was born in Antwerp, Belgium in 1870.

By April 1871, Joseph Jacklett was back in England. The 1871 census records Joseph Jacklett his wife Elizabeth, and their five children in Folkestone, Kent. Within a few years, Joseph Jacklett had established The Army Photographic Studio at No. 3 Great Bank Street, Aldershot, Hampshire. After two decades of travelling, Joseph Jacklett finally settled down in Aldershot, where he was to remain for almost another twenty years, until his death in 1892.

Presumably, during his early twenties Joseph William Jacklett assisted his father in his Aldershot studio. In 1883, Joseph William Jacklett married Ellen Voller (born 1852, Bramshott, Hampshire), a thirty year old cook who had been working as a domestic servant in London. [The marriage of Joseph William Jacklett and Ellen Voller was registered in the district of Kensington during the 2nd Quarter of 1883]. The following year, Mrs Ellen Jacklett gave birth to a son, who was named Joseph William Jacklett after his father. [The birth of Joseph William Jacklett was registered in the Farnham District of Hampshire during the 2nd Quarter of 1884].

By the end of 1883, Joseph William Jacklett had established a photographic portrait studio at 160 Victoria Road, Aldershot, under the name of J. W. Jacklett junior. At this time, J. W. Jacklett junior is described as an "Artist and Photographer" and the studio in Victoria Road was known as "The Berlin Studio". Joseph William Jacklett's time as a studio proprietor was very brief. Towards the end of 1884, when he was only twenty-eight years of age, Joseph William Jacklett died following a bizarre accident at an Aldershot hotel. Joseph William Jacklett was at the Churchwarden Hotel in Aldershot, when a hotel waiter named Ernest Mayers had brought some "explosive material" into the bar, presumably to help the lighting of a fire. Joseph William Jacklett apparently held the explosive over the gas flame and the explosion "blew off his fingers". Jacklett was taken to a hospital in Guildford, where he later died during an operation to save his hand. [The death of Joseph William Jacklett was recorded in Guildford, Surrey during the 4th Qtr of 1884]. According to The Times newspaper, the explosive material was dynamite : "Joseph Jacklett had died from holding some dynamite over a gas flame at Aldershot " * [ See also the news item headed "The Explosion at Aldershot" taken from The Times newspaper, dated Thursday, 25th December,1884, illustrated at bottom right].

Mrs Ellen Jacklett (1852-1932)

After Joseph William Jacklett's death in December 1884, his widow Mrs Ellen Jacklett took over the running of her late husband's studio at 160 Victoria Road, Aldershot. Kelly's Directory of Hampshire issued in 1889 lists Mrs Joseph William Jacklett as the proprietor of the studio at 160 Victoria Road. The same 1889 directory records Joseph Jacklett, Ellen Jacklett's father-in-law, as a photographer in Union Street, Aldershot. Although Mrs Jacklett was recorded as the proprietor of the Victoria Road studio in Aldershot trade directories, the photographic portraits that were produced at 160 Victoria Road, Aldershot carry the trade plate of  "J. W. Jacklett", the name of her late husband Joseph William Jacklett.

[ABOVE] The trade plate of  J. W. Jacklett of 160 Victoria Road, Aldershot, taken from a carte-de-visite  photograph (c1890). At this time, the studio of J. W. Jacklett at 160 Victoria Road was being run by the photographer's widow, Mrs Ellen Jacklett (c1851-1932).

In Kelly's directories of Hampshire published between 1885 and 1890, the proprietor of the studio at 160 Victoria Road, Aldershot was given as Mrs Joseph William Jacklett, yet, after 1895, her name is often printed as Mrs Helen Jacklett ( she had been christened Ellen Voller and is recorded as Ellen Jacklett on census returns, but she either preferred the name of Helen or the compilers of Kelly's directories had interpreted 'Ellen' as 'Helen'.

Between 1898 and 1905, Ellen Jacklett's son Joseph William Jacklett (1884-1926) was working as a photographer in Bexhill-on-Sea. Around 1905, Joseph William Jacklett returned to Aldershot, accompanied by his partner Bertha Duke. Joseph, now aged twenty-one, but with six or more years of experience as a photographer, joined his mother at her photographic studio in Victoria Road.

Mrs Ellen Jacklett, was the proprietor of the photographic studio at 160 Victoria Road, Aldershot until around 1907. By the time the 1911 census was taken, both Joseph Jacklett and his mother were living in the Camberley area of Surrey. On the 1911 census return, Mrs Ellen Jacklett is described as a sixty-one year old widow, running a Lodging House at 29 Portersbury Road, Camberley, Surrey.

Mrs Ellen Jacklett died in 1932 when she was in her early eighties. [ The death of Mrs Ellen Jacklett was registered in Brentford, Middlesex, during the 4th Quarter of 1932 ].

 

 

 

 

* Quoted on page 96 of Cannibalism and the Common Law  by A. W. Brian Simpson (1994)

[ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait taken at Joseph Jascklett junior's studio at 160 Victoria Road, Aldershot (c1884)

[Prue McKay and Mark Parsons / The Jerome Album]

[ABOVE] The design on the reverse of a carte-de-visite portrait taken at Joseph Jacklett junior's studio at 160 Victoria Road, Aldershot (c1884). At this time, J. W. Jacklett Junior's studio in Victoria Road was known as "The Berlin Studio".
 

[ABOVE] The death of Joseph William Jacklett (then known as Joseph William Jacklett junior) as reported in The Times newspaper on Thursday 25th December,1884.
 

[ABOVE] Soldiers marching down Victoria Road, Aldershot in 1904. Mrs Ellen Jacklett's photographic studio at 160 Victoria Road, Aldershot was used regularly by the military personnel based at Aldershot Barracks.

 

Carte-de-visite portraits by Joseph William Jacklett junior of Aldershot

[ABOVE] A full length portrait of a man holding a walking cane and bowler hat. A carte-de-visite photograph taken at Joseph William Jascklett's Berlin Studio at 160 Victoria Road, Aldershot (c1884). Printed on the reverse of this photograph are the words " J. W. Jacklett, Junior, Photographer, The Berlin Studio, 160 Victoria Road, Aldershot. Copies of this picture can always be had". [ABOVE] A carte-de-visite vignette portrait taken at Joseph William Jascklett's studio at 160 Victoria Road, Aldershot (c1884). At this time, Joseph Jacklett (1826-1892), Joseph William Jascklett's father, was also operating a photographic portrait studio in Aldershot, so the young photographer styled himself as "J. W. Jacklett junior" to avoid confusion.

[Prue McKay and Mark Parsons / The Jerome Album]

 

Joseph William Jacklett returns to Aldershot

    

[ABOVE] The trade plate of  J. W. Jacklett of 160 Victoria Road, Aldershot, taken from a cabinet photograph (c1900). At this time, the studio of J. W. Jacklett at 160 Victoria Road was being run by the photographer's widow, Mrs Ellen Jacklett (1852-1932).

 

 Joseph William Jacklett (1884-1926)

J. W. Jacklette's Sackville Studio at 7 Sea Road, Bexhill-on-Sea closed around 1905. By 1907, Joseph William Jacklett  had returned to his mother's studio at 160 Victoria Road, Aldershot. Mrs Ellen Jacklett had been running the photographic studio at  160 Victoria Road, Aldershot since her husband's death in 1884. Miss Bertha Duke, the former Manageress of J. W. Jacklette's Sackville Studio had accompanied Joseph Jacklett to Aldershot. Bertha Duke became pregnant and, early in 1908, she married the young photographer. At the time of their marriage, Bertha Duke was thirty-one and Joseph Jacklett was nearly twenty-four. [The marriage of Joseph William Jacklett and Bertha Duke was registered in the district of Farnham during the First Quarter of 1908 ]. A few months after their wedding, Bertha gave birth to a baby daughter named Nellie Frances Jacklett [ The birth of Nellie Jacklett was registered in the district of Farnham during the 2nd Quarter of 1908 ].

Up to the time of his marriage in 1908, Joseph William Jacklett was probably working as a photographer at his mother's studio at 160 Victoria Road, Aldershot. By 1911, the Jacklett family had moved to Surrey and the studio at 160 Victoria Road, Aldershot was being operated by The London Portrait Company.

At the time of the 1911 census, both Joseph Jacklett and his mother were living in the area of Camberley in Surrey. Mrs Ellen Jacklett, described as a sixty-one year old widow, was running a Lodging House at 29 Portersbury Road, Camberley, Surrey. Mrs Jacklett's son, Joseph was residing with his wife Bertha and their three year old daughter Nellie in York Town, Camberley. York Town occupied a position near the border with Berkshire and Hampshire and was situated about a mile from Camberley railway station. York Town had grown up around the gates of the Royal Military College at Sandhurst and so it is likely that many of Jacklett's customers were still drawn from the military. The 1911 census records Joseph William Jacklett and his family occupying a house in West Street, Frimley Road, York Town, Camberley. On the census return, Joseph William Jacklett is described as a 'Photographer', aged 28. At the time of the 1911 census, Bertha was the mother of one child, but, towards the end of the year, Joseph and Bertha Jacklett  visited Pembroke, where their second daughter Josephine Wilfreda Jacklett was born during the 4th Quarter of 1911.  

Mrs Bertha Jacklett died in 1917 at the age of 41. [ The death of Mrs Bertha Jacklett was registered in the district of Farnham during the 3rd Quarter of 1917 ]. Joseph William Jacklett , together with his two daughters, moved to Kingston-upon- Thames, where he died in 1926, aged 42. [ The death of Joseph William Jacklett was registered in the district of Kingston during the 2nd Quarter of 1926 ].  Mrs Ellen Jacklett, Joseph Jacklett's mother, died in 1932 when she was in her early eighties. [ The death of Mrs Ellen Jacklett was registered in Brentford, Middlesex, during the 4th Quarter of 1932 ].

Nellie Frances Jacklett (born 1908, Aldershot, Hants.), the eldest daughter of Joseph and Bertha Jacklett, married Joseph Douglas Peyton (born 1907, Lewisham) at a ceremony in Kingston-upon-Thames in 1931.

Joseph William Jacklett's youngest daughter, Josephine Wilfreda Jacklett gave birth to a son named Michael in Hillingdon County Hospital on 3rd May 1935. Nearly twenty years later, in 1964, Josephine married John Coe.

[ABOVE] Victoria Road, Aldershot (c1910). Mrs Ellen Jacklett and her son Joseph William Jacklett operated a photographic studio at 160 Victoria Road, Aldershot between 1905 and 1907. The studio had been established by Joseph William Jacklett (1856-1884), Joseph's father, around 1884.

[ABOVE] A map showing where Joseph William Jacklett (1884-1926) lived and worked during the last twenty years of his life. [ The locations are marked by purple dots ]. Between 1905 and 1908, Joseph William Jacklett was probably helping his mother operate her photographic studio in Aldershot. By 1911, Joseph William Jacklett was working as a photographer in York Town, between Camberley and Sandhurst. Joseph William Jacklett ended his days in Kingston-upon-Thames.

[ABOVE] The Royal Military College at Sandhurst. Around 1910, Joseph William Jacklett set himself up as a photographer in York Town, a settlement which had grown up around the gates of Sandhurst Military College

 

Joseph Jacklett (c1826-1892) also known as Joseph Jackolett

Joseph Jacklett (also known as Joseph Jackolett and Joseph Jacolette) was born in Bristol around 1825. His unusual surname suggests that his father or grandfather originated from continental Europe. An account of the photographic career of his eldest son Martin Jacolette (born c1850 Tavistock, Devon) states that his father (Joseph Jacolette) was "a Swiss miniature painter". Joseph Jacklett (Jacolette) makes it clear on census returns that he was born in Bristol around 1825, but it is possible that Joseph Jacolette's father was a Swiss-born artist. There was a well-known lithographer named Jean Jacottet (1806-1880) who originated from Switzerland. An artist named Louis Julien Jacottet (possibly identical to Jean Jacottet) was active as a lithographer in France in the 1850s. Interestingly, when Joseph Jacolett was recorded in the 1841 census, his name was written down as "Josh Jackotett". The 1841 census records Joseph Jackotett as a fourteen year old employee of William Graham, a pawnbroker of St Thomas Street, Bristol.

There is a connection between the Paris-based lithographer "J. Jacottet" and the West Country of England where Joseph Jacolette was born and brought up. Launcelot Elford Reed (1793-1845) was a Devon-born artist who resided in the market town of Tiverton between 1819 and 1845. In the mid-1820s, Launcelot Reed drew some studies of coastal scenes around Torquay in Devon, which were later turned into lithographs and published by the London printing firm owned by Samuel Straker (1806-1874). The artist who was employed by Straker to copy Reed's drawings on to the lithographic stone was J. Jacottet. The Straker series of lithographic prints, which were published around 1828, carry the credit "Drawn on Stone by J. Jacottet". Further editions of Launcelot Reed's "Views of the Torquay Area" were published by Auguste Bry of Paris. Significantly, a print entitled "Babbacombe, Devon", held by Torre Abbey Museum, includes the following credits printed on the margin of the picture - "Drawn by L. E. Reed, Printed by Auguste Bry of Paris, Drawn on Stone by J. Jackolett". The spelling of the surname of the Swiss-born artist and lithographer varied from one edition to another - Jacottet, Jaconett, and Jackolett are some of the versions used. Fourteen year old  "Josh Jackotett" of Gloucestershire is the only person with a similar sounding name in the 1841 census. Could this boy be the son of the Swiss lithographer Jean Jacottet or Louis Julien Jacottet ? Or was Joseph Jacolette the son of another Monsieur Jacolette, the Swiss-born miniature artist ?

When the 1851 census was taken, Joseph Jacklett went under the name of Joseph Jackolete. At the time of the census, which was carried out on the night of the 30th March, 1851, twenty-six year old Joseph Jackolete was lodging at The Boot Inn, a public house situated in the High Street of Merthyr Tydfil in Glamorganshire, Wales. Lodging with Joseph was his wife Elizabeth, a twenty-two year old artist from Aberdeen, Scotland, and their three month old son John Martin Jackolete, who had been born in Tavistock, Devon at the end of 1850 or at the very beginning of 1851. [ The birth of John Jackolett was registered in the district of Tavistock during the First Quarter of 1851 ]. Elizabeth Martin (born c1828, Aberdeen, Scotland) was probably Joseph Jackolett's common-law wife when John Jackolett was born in Tavistock. John Jackolett, Joseph's first born son, initially went under the name of John Martin Jackolett, but in adulthood he preferred to be known as Martin Jacolette, the name he used when he worked as a photographer in later life. Although on the 1851 census return Joseph Jackolete's wife, Elizabeth Jackolete, is described as an "Artist", this might have been an error on the enumerator's part, as the column headed "Rank, Profession or Occupation" alongside Joseph Jackolete's name is blank. It is very likely that Joseph Jackolete was working as an itinerant artist at this stage of his career and so it is possible that the census enumerator has either entered the word "Artist" against the wrong name or that both Joseph and his wife Elizabeth were artists by profession.

By the Summer of 1852, Joseph Jackolett and his young family were in Lancashire and residing in the city of Manchester. On 8th June 1852, the union of Joseph Jackolett and Elizabeth Martin was solemnized at Manchester Cathedral. From Manchester, Joseph Jackolett and his family probably travelled to Liverpool, where they took a ship to Ireland. By the end of 1853, Joseph Jackolett had reached the Southern Irish seaport of Cork. Joseph Jackolett was now working as an itinerant photographer. On 14th December 1853, Joseph Jackolett placed a notice on the front page of the Cork Examiner newspaper advertising his services as a photographic portrait artist. The advertisement informed the inhabitants of Cork that Joseph Jackolett would be taking photographic portraits at "Mr Roche's, adjoining Examiner Office". After taking likenesses in the Irish seaport of Cork, Joseph Jackolett travelled 160 miles to the city of Dublin.

Joseph Jackolett worked as a photographic artist in Dublin for three or four years. It was while residing in Dublin that Elizabeth Jackolett gave birth to two or more children - Joseph William Jackolett, who was born in Dublin around 1856 and Elizabeth Jackolett, who arrived a year or so later. Another daughter, Sarah Jackolett, was born around 1859 either in Dublin or on the voyage back to England.

 

[ABOVE] A lithographic print entitled "Babbacombe, Devon", drawn on stone by J. Jackolett from an original picture by the Devonshire artist Launcelot Elford Reed (1793-1845).

Torre Abbey Museum

[ABOVE] "Daddy's Hole, Torquay", drawn originally by the the Devonshire artist Launcelot Elford Reed (1793-1845) and published later as a lithographic print by Auguste Bry of Paris. On the bottom right-hand corner of the print is the lithographer's credit "Drawn on Stone by J. Jacottet". [SEE THE DETAIL ON THE RIGHT]. Jean Jacottet (1806-1880) was a well-known lithographer from Switzerland who copied pictures on to lithographic stones for printing firms in London and Paris.

Joseph Jackolett in the North of England (1859-1862)

Not long after the birth of their fourth child, Joseph and Elizabeth Jackolett arrived in Leeds in West Yorkshire. According to Bernard and Pauline Heathcote's study of early photographic portrait studios, Joseph Jackolett was working as a photographer in Leeds in 1859. The census taken on 7th April 1861 records the 'Jackolet' family at Albion Yard, Briggate in the centre of Leeds. Joseph Jackolett (mistakenly recorded as "John Jackolet") is described on the 1861 census return as a thirty-four year old "Photographist". Eliza Jackolett, Joseph's Scottish-born wife, is also shown in employment, but the occupation recorded is difficult to decipher. ( Eliza's occupation or profession is given either as "Artist" or "Assistant"). Four children are listed in the Jackolett household - John (Martin Jacolette), aged 14, Joseph, aged 4, Eliza, aged 3, and one year old Sarah, who was probably approaching her second birthday.

After a short stay in Leeds, Joseph Jackolett was on the move again. By the Autumn of 1862, the Jackolett family had reached Bolton in Lancashire, where a daughter named Isabella Jackolett was born. [ The birth of Isabella Jackolett was registered in the district of Bolton during the 3rd Quarter of 1862 ].
[RIGHT] The Leeds district of Briggate where Joseph Jackolett resided with his family between 1859 and 1862. (A mid 19th century engraving by T. A. Prior)       Leeds Library

Joseph Jackolett in Northampton (1863-1869)

After a decade of working as an itinerant photographer, Joseph Jackolett eventually settled in Northampton where he established a permanent photographic portrait studio. Joseph Jackolett set himself up as a photographic artist at 30 Waterloo, Northampton.

Joseph Jackolett was based in Northampton for a period of six years between 1863 and 1869. It was while residing in Northampton that Mrs Elizabeth Jackolett gave birth to her sixth child, a daughter named Jane [ The birth of Jane Jackolett was registered in Northampton during the 2nd Quarter of 1864 ]. Sadly, the Jackolett family also suffered a loss during their stay in Northampton. Sarah Jackolett, Joseph's second eldest daughter, died in Northampton early in 1866 before reaching her sixth birthday.  [ The death of Sarah Jackolett, aged 5, was registered in Northampton during the First Quarter of 1866 ]. In 1869, Joseph Jacklett was listed as a photographer at 30 Derogate, Northampton in a local trade directory.

Joseph Jackolett was working in Northampton during the height of "cartomania", the popular craze for obtaining carte-de-visite portraits. The carte-de-visite was a small photographic portrait pasted on a card mount the same size as conventional visiting cards (roughly 21/2 inches by 41/4 inches or 6.3 cm by 10.5 cm). This photograph format originated in France and so these small portraits came to be known as a 'cartes-de-visite', the French term for visiting cards. A number of carte-de-visite portraits taken at Jackolett's photographic studios in Northampton, have survived and provide evidence of Joseph Jackolett's relatively long stay in Northampton. However, by 1870, after six years in Northampton, the Jacklett family were on the move again, this time making a journey to Europe. It was while travelling through Belgium, that Mrs Elizabeth Jacklett gave birth to her seventh and final child. The baby daughter, who was born in the Belgian city of Antwerp during the Spring or early Summer of 1870, was christened Sarah Jackolett in memory of the young daughter who had died in Northampton four years previously.

By the time the 1871 census was taken, Joseph Jackolett and his family were back in England and residing in Folkestone, Kent. Since returning from the continent, Joseph Jackolett had anglicized the spelling of his surname to 'Jacklett'. The 1871 census records Joseph Jacklett, his wife Elizabeth and five of their six surviving children at 14 Charlotte Terrace, Folkestone, Kent. Joseph Jacklett is described on the census return as a forty-four year old "Photographist". Joseph's eldest son, John Martin Jackolett had embarked on his own photographic career in Dover under the name of Martin Jacolette. The 1871 census records Martin J. Jacolette as a twenty-one year old "Photographer" lodging with a retired baker at 2 Clarence Place, Dover, Kent.

[ABOVE] The trade plate of Joseph Jackolett, photographic artist of 30 Waterloo, Northampton (c1864). The photographer went under the name of 'Joseph Jackolett' until about 1870. After this date, the photographer anglicised the spelling of his surname to "Jacklett"

[ABOVE] The trade plate of Joseph Jackolett, photographic artist of Waterloo, Northampton (c1868). By 1869, Joseph Jackolett's studio address had changed from 30 Waterloo to 30 Derogate, Northampton.
 

Carte-de-visite Portaits by Joseph Jackolett of Northampton

[ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait of a seated woman and a young girl photographed by Joseph Jackolett of 30 Waterloo, Northampton (c1864). At this point in his career Joseph Jacklett spelt his surname "Jackolett" [ABOVE] The trade plate of Jackolett, a photographer with a studio at 30 Waterloo, Northampton (c1864). 'Jackolett' was the name used by the photographer Joseph Jackolett until about 1870. [ABOVE] A vignette portrait of a young cleric photographed at Jackolett's Photographic Studio, Waterloo, Northampton (c1866). At this point in his career Joseph Jacklett spelt his surname "Jackolett"

[ABOVE] The trade plate of Jackolett of Waterloo, Northampton, as shown on the reverse of a carte-de-visite portrait taken around 1868.

[ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait of a man leaning on a balustrade,  photographed by Joseph Jackolett of Waterloo, Northampton (c1868).
At this point in his career Joseph Jacklett spelt his surname "Jackolett". The painted backdrop is particularly impressive.

[ABOVE] The trade plate of  Jackolett's Photographic Studio, Waterloo, Northampton as shown on the reverse of a carte-de-visite portrait (c1866). The printed publicity gives Jackolett's prices - six for 6 shillings, one shilling for each further copy - and informs foreign customers that both French and Italian are spoken at the studio.


Joseph Jacklett (Jackolett) in Aldershot (c1873-1892)

[ABOVE] A view of the Military Camp on the outskirts of  Aldershot, taken from a picture postcard (c1910).

Joseph Jacklett (Jackolett) arrived in the garrison town of Aldershot around 1873. Originally an agricultural village with a population of less than a thousand, Aldershot was transformed by the construction of a military camp on the surrounding heathland in 1854. The War Department had purchased thousands of acres of barren heathland around Aldershot to house and train troops then needed for the Crimean War. A military camp housing thousands of soldiers was constructed to the north of the village. By 1861, the population of Aldershot had risen to almost 17,000, nearly 9,000 of which consisted of military personnel based in the Army Camp. Over the next twenty years the temporary huts were replaced by permanent, brick-built barracks for all branches of the military service, including the Cavalry and Artillery. When Joseph Jacklett set up his Army Photographic Studio at No. 3 Great Bank Street, Aldershot around 1873, the population of Aldershot had reached 22,000, including 10,000 soldiers housed in the army barracks. Not surprisingly, a good number of Jacklett's customers were drawn from Aldershot's military camp.

Joseph Jacklett's studio was situated at the top end of Great Bank Street, a short walking distance from the Cavalry Barracks to the west and the original permanent army barracks to the north. Joseph Jacklett is listed as a photographer at 3 Bank Street, Aldershot in the Post Office Directory of Hampshire, published in 1875. A few year later, the name of Bank Street was changed to Grosvenor Road.

[ABOVE] Portrait of two Scottish soldiers and a boy in uniform, a carte-de-viste by Joseph Jacklett of 3 Great Bank Street, Aldershot (c1875).  By 1875, Joseph Jacklett had settled in the garrison town of Aldershot, where he worked as a photographer until his death in 1892.

[ABOVE] Joseph Jacklett listed as a photographer at 3 Bank Street, Aldershot in the 1875 Post Office Directory of Hampshire. Around 1877, Bank Street was re-named Grosvenor Road. When the 1881 census was taken Joseph Jacklett  and his family were recorded at 3 Grosvenor Road, Aldershot.
 
Joseph Jacklett  and his children

When the census of Aldershot was taken on the 3rd April 1881, Joseph Jacklett was recorded with his wife and three youngest daughters at 3 Grosvenor Road, Aldershot, Hampshire. Jacklett's original photographic studio had a business address of No. 3 Great Bank Street, Aldershot, but around 1877 the road name was changed and Jacklett was given a new address of 3 Grosvenor Road, Aldershot. By April 1881, Joseph Jacklett's eldest son and daughter had been married for a number of years. John Martin Jacklett (born c1850, Tavistock, Devon), Joseph's eldest son, had embarked on a photographic career in Dover, Kent, under the name of Martin Jacolette. In the Spring of 1872, twenty-two year old Martin John Jacolette married Eliza Harbour (born 1846, Dover, Kent ) in his bride's home town. Joseph Jacklett's eldest daughter, Elizabeth Jacklett married Henry Beasley in Aldershot during the 2nd Quarter of 1876. By the end of 1881, seventeen year old Jane Jacklett had also married. Isabella Jacklett (born 1862, Bolton, Lancashire) married Henry Herbert Thompson in 1882. At the time of her marriage, Isabella Jacklett was employed as an assistant governess, but by the time the 1901 census was taken she was running a 'fancy ware' shop in Aldershot. Joseph Jacklett's youngest son Joseph William Jacklett (born c1856, Dublin) married Ellen Voller (born 1852, Bramshott, Hampshire), a thirty year old cook, in 1883. Around the time of his marriage, Joseph Jacklett junior opened a photographic portrait studio at 160 Victoria Road, Aldershot, but he died the following year at the age of twenty-eight. [ See Joseph William Jacklett (1856-1884) in the panel above ].

Sarah Jacklett (born 1870, Antwerp, Belgium) was living with her parents at 5 Union Street, Aldershot, when the next census was taken on 5th April 1891, but within twelve months she, too, had married. On 22nd March 1892, Sarah Jacklett, described as the twenty-one year old daughter of "Joseph Jacklett, Artist", married thirty-six year old Caleb Cobbett, a Warrant Officer in the Queen's Regiment stationed in Malta. Sarah's husband, Caleb Cobbett (born 1856, Woking Surrey) was the son of Mary and Charles Cobbett of Woking, Surrey. In 1881, Caleb Cobbett was a Sergeant in the 1st Battalion of the 2nd Queen's Royal Regiment based at the Aldershot Army Camp. It is tempting to assume that Sergeant Cobbett met Sarah Jacklett when he visited her father's photographic studio to have his portrait taken.

1881 Census : 3 Grosvenor Road, Aldershot, Hampshire

NAME

 

AGE

OCCUPATION

PLACE OF BIRTH

Joseph Jacklett Head

55

Photographer

Bristol, Gloucestershire
Elizabeth Jacklett wife

53

  Aberdeen, Scotland
Isabella Jacklett daughter

18

Assistant Governess

Bolton, Lancashire
Jane Jacklett daughter

17

  Northampton
Sarah Jacklett daughter

11

  Antwerp, Belgium

[ABOVE] An extract from the 1881 census showing the photographer Joseph Jacklett recorded with his family at 3 Grosvenor Road, Aldershot. Originally No. 3 Great Bank Street, Joseph Jacklett's home and studio address changed to 3 Grosvenor Road, Aldershot around 1877. By 1881, only three Jacklett daughters were living at home with Joseph and Elizabeth Jacklett. The birthplaces of the three daughters provide evidence of Joseph Jacklett's early career as an itinerant photographer. Joseph Jacklett remained in Aldershot for the last two decades of his photographic career.

[ABOVE] The trade plate of Joseph Jacklett of the Army Photographic Studio, No. 3 Great Bank Street, Aldershot, taken from the reverse of a carte-de-visite portrait taken around 1875. A few year later Joseph Jacklett's studio address changed when Aldershot's Bank Street was re-named Grosvenor Road. When the 1881 census was taken, Joseph Jacklett's home address was recorded as 3 Grosvenor Road, Aldershot.

[ABOVE] The trade plate of Martin Jacolette of Northbrook House, Dover. "Martin Jacolette" was the trade name of John Martin Jackolett (born c1850, Tavistock, Devon), the eldest son of veteran photographer Joseph Jackolett (c1826-1892), also known as Joseph Jacklett of Aldershot.

 

[ABOVE] A 1910 map of Aldershot showing the location of Joseph Jacklett's Army Photographic Studio at No. 3 Great Bank Street (3 Grosvenor Road), Aldershot [ marked with a red dot ]. This map clearly shows the proximity of Jacklett's photographic studio to the military barracks and army camps situated to the north and west of his home in Grosvenor Road, Aldershot. Joseph Jacklett established his Army Photographic Studio at No. 3 Great Bank Street around 1873. Great Bank Street was re-named Grosvenor Road around 1877 and when the 1881 census was taken, Joseph Jacklett was recorded with his wife and three daughters at No. 3 Grosvenor Road, Aldershot [ marked with a red dot ]. By 1890, Joseph Jacklett had moved his photographic studio to 5 Union Street, Aldershot [ marked with a blue dot ]. By this date, Joseph Jacklett's widowed daughter-in-law, Mrs Ellen Jacklett, was operating a photographic portrait studio at 160 Victoria Road, Aldershot  [ marked with a purple dot ].

 

[ABOVE] Union Street, Aldershot, from a picture postcard (c1910). The  photographer Joseph Jacklett (c1826-1892) moved his studio premises to No. 5 Union Street, Aldershot sometime before 1889. Joseph Jacklett, was residing at  5 Union Street with his wife Eliza and their youngest daughter Sarah when the 1891 census of Aldershot was taken.


Sometime before 1889, Joseph Jacklett opened a new photographic portrait studio in Union Street, Aldershot. The 1891 census records Joseph and Elizabeth Jacklett and their youngest daughter, twenty year old Sarah Jacklett residing at 5 Union Street, Aldershot. On the census return, sixty-two year old Joseph Jacklett is entered as a self-employed photographer ("Neither Employer nor Employed"). The following year, Sarah Jacklett travelled to Malta to marry Regimental Sergeant Major Caleb Cobbett. While his daughter was away in Malta, Joseph Jacklett died in Aldershot at the age of sixty-five.[ Joseph Jacklett's death was registered in the the district of Farnham during the First Quarter of 1892]. Mrs Elizabeth Jacklett, Joseph Jacklett's widow, closed her late husband's studio in Aldershot's Union Street and moved to Guildford in Surrey, where she died in 1894, aged 66.

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

Martin John Jacolette (John Martin Jackolett)  (born c1850, Tavistock, Devon)

John Martin Jackolett (who practised photography under the name of Martin Jacolette) was born in Tavistock, Devon, around 1850. [ The birth of John Jackolett was registered in the district of Tavistock during the First Quarter of 1851 ]. John Martin Jackolett was the eldest child of Elizabeth Martin and Joseph Jackolett, an itinerant artist and photographer.

Sometime before 1871, John Jackolett joined the photography firm of Lambert Weston & Son of Dover and Folkestone. Lambert Weston (c1806-1895), the founder of the firm, ran the studio at 18 Waterloo Crescent, Dover, and his son Sidney Cooper Weston (1842-1893) was in charge of  Weston & Son's branch studio at 23 Sandgate Road, Folkestone. According to David Webb, John Jackolett was employed by Lambert Weston as a Studio Manager at his Dover branch studio. The 1871 census records Martin J. Jacolette as a twenty-one year old "Photographer" lodging with a retired baker at 2 Clarence Place, Dover, Kent. In the Spring of 1872, twenty-two year old Martin John Jacolette married a local young woman named Eliza Harbour (born 1846, Dover, Kent ). Eliza Harbour, the daughter of Lydia and Henry Harbour, a dairy farmer of Beech Grove, Ewell, was born in Dover on 30th August 1846. (When she was baptised at the Church of St Mary the Virgin in Dover on 11th October 1846, Eliza's surname was spelt "Harbour", yet when her marriage to Martin John Jacolette was registered her surname was incorrectly transcribed as "Harbow").

In 1875, Martin Jacolette's wife Eliza was delivered of a daughter, but sadly the baby girl died soon after birth during the 4th Quarter of 1875. Mrs Eliza Jacolette gave birth to two more daughters over the next couple of years. Beatrice Eliza Jacolette was born in Dover during the Second Quarter of 1877, and her sister Cara Clarissa Jacolette arrived during the 3rd Quarter of 1878.

In 1881, at the age of thirty, John Jacolette, now known professionally as Martin Jacolette, established his own photographic portrait studio at his residential address of 1 Priory Hill, Dover. In the list of Dover's Private Residents, Kelly's 1882 Directory of Kent shows John Jacolette at 1 Priory Hill, Dover and carte-de-visite portraits from this period carry the words "Martin Jacolette, Artist and Photographer, Art Studio and Residence, 1 Priory Hill, near Town Hall, Dover."

[ABOVE] The reverse of a carte-de-visite photograph by Martin Jacolette, which gives his studio and residential address as 1 Priory Hill, Dover. (c1882)

The 1881 census return records Martin Jacolette and his young family at his residence at  1 Priory Hill, Dover. Martin J. Jacolette is described on the census return as an "Artist Photographer", aged 30. Also residing at the living quarters attached to Martin Jacolette's Art Studio at 1 Priory Hill, Dover was his wife Eliza and their two infant daughters Beatrice, aged 3 and Cara, aged 2. No.1 Priory Hill was near the junction with Dover's High Street and close to the "Mason Dieu", the Old Town Hall of Dover.

About 1889, Martin Jacolette vacated his studio and residence at 1 Priory Hill, Dover and established a new photographic portrait studio at North Brook House, Biggin Street, Dover. The building at 1 Priory Hill, Dover was taken over by Mr & Mrs C. T. Long, who used it as a School of Dancing.

[ABOVE] The signature of photographer Martin Jacolette as printed on a carte-de-visite issued around 1890. Martin preferred to spell his surname as "Jacolette" rather than "Jackolett" or "Jacklett".

[ABOVE] A portrait of Arthur Spain, a cabinet photograph taken at Martin Jacolette's West London studio at Queens Gate Hall, Harrington Road, South Kensington (c1897). A name pencilled on the reverse of the cabinet card, identifies the sitter as "Arthur Spain". There were several men named Arthur Spain living in London in the late 1890s, but the most likely candidate is Arthur Spain (born c1860) an electrical engineer from Hammersmith. Negative No. 34,137a

 

[ABOVE] The reverse of the cabinet photograph of Arthur Spain, showing the studio details of the photographer Martin Jacolette (c1897). In the mid 1890s, Martin Jacolette was operating a studio in London at Queens Gate Hall, Harrington Road, South Kensington, and a studio on the Kent coast at Northbrook House, Biggin Street, Dover. Negative No. 34,137a. The name "Arthur Spain", pencilled on the cabinet card, identifies the sitter.

 

 
Martin John Jacolette in London and Dover

[ABOVE] A vignette portrait of an unknown woman, a carte-de-visite photograph taken at Martin Jacolette's studio at Northbrook House, Biggin Street, Dover, Kent. (c1890)

Around 1888, Martin Jacolette set up a new photographic portrait studio at North Brook House, Biggin Street, Dover, next to the "Queen's Head" public house. North Brook House was the name given to No. 17 Biggin Street, Dover, a business premises formerly shared by Thomas Hollaway, a bootmaker, and Charles Hadlow, a plumber and painter. The 1891 census lists the occupants of 17 Biggin Street, Dover as Martin J. Jacolette, photographer (aged 40), his wife Mrs Eliza Jacolette (aged 44), their two teenage daughters, Beatrice E. Jacolette (aged 14) and Cara C. Jacolette (aged 13) and twenty-one year old Charlotte Rogers, who was employed as a general domestic servant.

Early in 1890, Martin Jacolette purchased the London studio of Henry W. Ashdown at Queens Gate Hall, Harrington Road, South Kensington. The former proprietor of the studio at Queens Gate Hall, Henry William Ashdown (1844-1908) had previously operated a photographic portrait studio in Hastings before setting up a studio in London. Between 1887 and 1889, the photographer Henry Ashdown had operated from premises at Queens Gate Hall, 42 Harrington Road, South Kensington, but by the beginning of 1890, Ashdown was in financial difficulties, eventually having to face a County Court judgement concerning his debts in January 1890. Henry Ashdown was obliged to sell his photography business to satisfy his creditors.

Martin Jacolette acquired Henry Ashdown's photographic studio at Queens Gate Hall early in 1890. Queen's Gate Hall was a public hall that hosted theatrical productions, musical concerts, public receptions and was also used as a meeting place for various societies and associations. Jacolette's Queens Gate Hall studio, which, according to its own publicity, practised "High Class Portraiture" attracted many distinguished sitters. Among Jacolette's clientele were Lady Sibell Mary Wyndham (1855-1929), the daughter of the 9th Earl of Scarborough, Hardinge Stanley Giffard (1823-1921), Earl of Halsbury and three times Lord Chancellor of Great Britain, Sir Arthur Guillum Scott (1842-1909), a Senior Accountant at the India Office, and Mrs Annie Thynne (1848-1937), a niece of the famous artist James McNeill Whistler. By 1902, Martin Jacolette had expanded his studio premises at Queens Gate Hall so that it spanned 38, 40 & 42 Harrington Road, South Kensington.

In 1895, Martin Jacolette became a Member of the Royal Photographic Society, exhibiting three portrait studies (platinum prints) at the Fortieth Annual Exhibition of the RPS in the year he joined the Society. Jacolette went on to serve on the RPS Selection Committee and showed his studio portraits at the Royal Photographic Society's annual London exhibitions in 1902 and 1903. During this period Martin Jacolette became an important figure in the world of professional photography. In March 1898, Percy Lund (1864-1942), a well-known photographic journalist and publisher, produced a profile of 'Martin Jacolette of Queen's Gate Hall' in his monthly series of articles "Peeps at Professional Photographers".  Martin Jacolette was also the subject of articles published in the photographic journals Practical Photographer and Photogram. In 1901, Martin Jacolette was a founder member of the Professional Photographers' Association (PPA) and in 1906 he served as President of the PPA. The Professional Photographers' Association (PPA) was only open to Studio Principals and Studio Proprietors and had been set up to "Improve the status of those who practise photography as a profession; to defend their interests; to assist its members by advice; to afford them opportunities of meeting and discussing matters pertaining to the craft; and to uphold the rights and dignities of the profession by all legitimate means".

Although Martin Jacolette was now operating a large and successful high class portrait studio in the fashionable district of South Kensington, he kept his main residence at North Brook House, Biggin Street, Dover, which he maintained as a provincial studio. The 1901 census records Martin Jacolette as a fifty year old "Artist & Photographer" residing his wife Eliza and two daughters at 17 Biggin Street, Dover. Martin Jacolette's daughters were now in their early twenties,  Beatrice Eliza Jacolette was approaching her twenty-fourth birthday and Clara Clarissa Jacolette was 22. Four years later, in 1905, Beatrice Eliza Jacolette married George Grove Dale (born 1880, Rowley Regis, Staffordshire), a telephone clerk from Lambeth.

 

[ABOVE] The trade plate of  Martin Jacolette, photographer of South Kensington & Dover, as shown on a cabinet portrait taken in 1895. Martin Jacolette's two studio addresses - Queens Gate Hall, Harrington Road, South Kensington, London and North Brook House, Biggin Street, Dover - are printed on the right-hand side.

[ABOVE] The reverse of a carte-de-visite photograph by Martin Jacolette, North Brook House, Biggin Street, Dover. (c1890)

 
Cabinet Portraits taken at  Martin Jacolette's Studio at Queen's Gate Hall, Harrington Road, South Kensington
 
 Martin Jacolette's photographic portrait studio at Queens Gate Hall, 42 Harrington Road, South Kensington, photographed in 1904. [BELOW] Numbers 36-42 Harrington Road, South Kensington, from the  London Post Office Directory of 1895.

[ABOVE, TOP] Martin Jacolette's photographic portrait studio at Queens Gate Hall, 42 Harrington Road, South Kensington, photographed in 1904. By this date, Martin Jacolette's business premises had expanded to include other parts of the Queens Gate Hall building at numbers 38 to 42 Harrington Road. This building is now an exclusive private club called the Harrington Club. [ABOVE] A portrait of an unknown woman, a cabinet photograph taken at Martin Jacolette's West London studio at Queens Gate Hall, Harrington Road, South Kensington (c1895). Negative No. K29445a. The publicity on the reverse of this cabinet card mentions Martin Jacolette's branch studio in Dover.

[ABOVE] A portrait of a woman, a cabinet photograph taken at Martin Jacolette's West London studio at Queens Gate Hall, Harrington Road, South Kensington (1895). The reverse of the cabinet card is inscribed "Sept 1895, For A. C. Jefferies". Negative No. K29839

[ABOVE] The reverse of the cabinet photograph by Martin Jacolette (c1895). In the mid 1890s, Martin Jacolette was operating a studio in London at Queens Gate Hall, Harrington Road, South Kensington, and a studio on the Kent coast at Northbrook House, Biggin Street, Dover.

 

Martin Jacolette's Two Photographic Studios

 

[ABOVE] A portrait of a woman (autographed Lily '96), a cabinet photograph taken at Martin Jacolette's West London studio at Queens Gate Hall, Harrington Road, South Kensington (1896). The reverse of the cabinet card is inscribed "March 1896". Negative No. K30,505 B

 

[ABOVE] The reverse of the cabinet photograph by Martin Jacolette (1896). In the mid 1890s, Martin Jacolette was operating a studio in London at Queens Gate Hall, Harrington Road, South Kensington, and a studio on the Kent coast at Northbrook House, Biggin Street, Dover.
 

[ABOVE] The two studio addresses of Martin Jacolette of London & Dover - Queens Gate Hall, Harrington Road, South Kensington, London and North Brook House, Biggin Street, Dover - as printed at the foot of the photograph illustrated on the left.
 
Martin John Jacolette's Final Years and the Creation of Jacolette Studios Ltd
[ABOVE] A View of Dover Castle, photographed by Martin Jacolette of  North Brook House, Biggin Street, Dover. (c1900). The original photograph was an albumen print measuring 10" x 8", with the blind stamp "Jacolette, Dover" embossed in the lower right-hand corner.

Martin Jacolette had worked primarily as a portrait photographer in London, but from the late 1890s until his death in 1907, Jacolette produced a number of photographic views of his adopted town of Dover. In the 1890s, Martin Jacolette photographed a number of churches and notable buildings in Dover and scenes on Dover's seafront. Jacolette also made several studies of the famous white cliffs of Dover. Early in 1906, Martin Jacolette registered a number of photographic views of Dover at the Copyright Office of the Stationers' Company in London. The copyrighted images included "St Mary's Church, Dover", "Connaught Park, Dover" and "The Church and Roman Pharos (lighthouse), Dover Castle". All four photographs were albumen prints measuring 10" x 8". The copyright registration forms were completed by Martin Jacolette on 30th January 1906. When he completed the registration forms, Martin Jacolette gave his address as "17, Biggin Street, Dover, Kent".

From around 1905, Martin Jacolette produced picture postcards, some depicting scenes in and around Dover, others featuring personalities of the day such as the political activist and suffragette Mrs Emmeline Pankhurst (1858-1928).

Martin Jacolette appears to have shared his time between Dover and South Kensington. When in 1902 and 1903, he exhibited his portrait studies at the Royal Photographic Society's Annual Exhibitions, Jacolette gave his address as "38, 40, 42, Harrington Road, Kensington, S.W.", yet when he registered his photographic views of Dover at the Stationers' Company Office in London, he used his address in Biggin Street, Dover.

Martin Jacolette died in Kensington, West London on 2nd December 1907, at the age of 56. Jacolette's death was registered in the Kensington District of London and he was buried at Kensington's Hanwell Cemetery. By the time the 1911 census was taken, Martin Jacolette's widow had left Dover. The 1911 census records sixty-four year old Mrs Eliza Jacolette living in Wandsworth, London, with her unmarried daughter Cara Clarissa Jacolette, then aged 32. Mrs Eliza Jacolette died in the London Borough of Croydon in 1930 at the age of 83.

Jacolette Studios Ltd

After the death of Martin Jacolette, the studios at 38, 40 & 42 Harrington Road, Kensington continued to carry the "Jacolette" trade name up until about 1915. The photographic studio in Harrington Road was operated by a limited liability company called Jacolette Studios Ltd. The firm of "Jacolette" appears to have specialised in staged "action shots" and many of the photographs produced by Jacolette Studios Ltd in this period were used as illustrations to instructive articles published in magazines and journals such as "Every Woman's Encyclopaedia" and "Health & Vim". The "Jacolette" studio at 38, 40 & 42 Harrington Road, South Kensington closed around 1915 and Jacolette Studios Ltd moved to new premises at 125 Gloucester Road, Kensington. According to David Webb, Jacolette Studios Ltd were advertising their photographic services  throughout 1916 and 1917. The Companies Registration Office of the Board of Trade has a record of the dissolution of Jacolette Studios Ltd in 1917 [ Companies Registration Office : Files of Dissolved Companies for the year 1917 - "Company No.146225 ; Jacolette Studios Ltd." ]

 

 

 

Jacolette Studios Ltd

[ABOVE] The entry for Martin Jacolette, Photographer, 38, 40, & 42, Harrington Road, Kensington, S.W., trading as "Jacolette," as printed in the Commercial Section of the Post Office London Directory for 1910. Although still carrying the name the late photographer Martin Jacolette, who died in 1907, the studio was owned by Jacolete Studios Ltd. The firm of Jacolete Studios Ltd remained at the Harrington Road address until 1915, the year their business moved to 125 Gloucester Road, Kensington.

 

[ABOVE] "Love at First Sight", a scene demonstrated by the actors Godfrey Tearle and Mary Malone for an article entitled "Cinematograph Acting - A New Profession For Men And Women" published in "Every Woman's Encyclopaedia" around 1911. This photographic illustration by "Jacolette" is taken from a compilation of the series of  "Every Woman's Encyclopaedia" magazines published between 1910 and 1912. When this photograph was taken, the actors Godfrey Tearle and Mary Malone (real name Mary Essy Plant) were a married couple. Godfrey Seymour Tearle (1884-1953) was an American-born stage actor who began his film career in England in 1908. Mary Essy Plant (born c1880), who married Godfrey Tearle in London in 1906, performed under the stage name of "Mary Malone". The couple divorced in 1932. Godfrey Tearle went on to make a successful career on the cinema screen, appearing in films such as Alfred Hitchcock's "The 39 Steps" (1935) and "One of Our Aircraft is Missing" (1942).

[ABOVE] A photograph by "Jacolette" showing Miss Frances Weste, a young woman skilled in the martial arts, pinning her opponent to the ground. This picture was captioned "The arm-lock, with leg across throat", as an illustration to an article entitled "Self Defence for Women", which appeared in "Health & Vim" magazine in May 1912.

 

Action Shots by Jacolette Studios Limited

[ABOVE] A photograph by "Jacolette" of two young women engaged in 'jujutsu', an illustration to an article entitled "Self Defence for Women", which appeared in "Health & Vim" magazine in May 1912. The young woman on the floor was Miss Frances Weste, a young woman skilled in the martial arts. This photograph was taken at Queen's Gate Hall, Kensington, where Jacolette Studio Ltd. had their business premises. [ABOVE] "A Lovers Quarrel", a scene demonstrated by the actors Godfrey Tearle and Mary Malone, one of the photographic illustrations by "Jacolette", which appeared in the article "Cinematograph Acting - A New Profession For Men And Women" published in "Every Woman's Encyclopaedia" around 1911. [ABOVE] A step in the "Sailor's Hornpipe", a photographic illustration to "National Dances For Children" by Mrs Wordsworth of South Kensington, which appeared in "Every Woman's Encyclopaedia" around 1911.

 

 

Acknowledgements & Sources

I am grateful to Peter Bryan (Michael Jacklett), a descendant of Joseph Jackolette, J. W. Jacklett and Joseph William Jacklette, for motivating me to produce this account of the Jacklett Family. Both Peter Bryan and his wife Anne Bryan have contributed to the story of the Jacklett Family. Thanks to Jeremy Hodgkinson for providing the family photographs taken by Joseph William Jacklette at his Bexhill studio. I am grateful to photoLondon for providing information on Martin Jacolette on The Database of 19th Century Photographers and Allied Trades in London: 1841-1901 (based on the research of David Webb) which is featured on the photoLondon website.

PRIMARY SOURCES : Census returns : 1841, 1851, 1861, 1871, 1881, 1891, 1901, 1911 ; Hampshire, Kent, London and Sussex Trade Directories : Kelly's Directory of Hampshire : 1875, 1880, 1890, 1895, 1898, 1899, 1903, 1907. Kelly's Directory of Hampshire : 1878.  Kelly's Directory of Kent : 1891, 1903 ; Kelly's Post Office Directories of London: 1895, 1899, 1910, 1911, 1915 ; Kelly's Directory of Sussex : 1899, 1905; Pike's Directory of Hastings, St Leonards & Bexhill : 1901. The Bexhill Directory Year Book : 1900,1901, 1902, 1903, 1904, 1905.

 Newspapers : The Times (Thursday 25th December,1884) ; The London Gazette (7th January 1908)

OTHER SOURCES : Books : 'A Directory of London Photographers, 1841-1908' compiled by Michael Pritchard (PhotoResearch 1986, 1994) ;  'A FAITHFUL LIKENESS - The First Photographic Portrait Studios in the British Isles, 1841 to 1855' by Bernard & Pauline Heathcote (2002).  Journals & Magazines : "Every Woman's Encyclopaedia" (1910-1912), "Health & Vim" (May 1912).

Websites : Records of Baptisms & Marriages ( IGI ) on Family Search website ; Registers of Births, Marriages & Deaths at the FreeBMD website ; Database of 19th Century Photographers and Allied Trades in London: 1841-1901 on the website photoLondon ; National Archives website; The Jerome / West Photograph Album on Prue McKay's website The Rootschat Collection of Victorian and Edwardian Photography (Thanks to Mark Parsons and Prue McKay). Information about J. W. Jacklett's military photographs on the Soldiers of the Queen website.

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Index of Bexhill Photographers

Bexhill Photographers  (A - B) Alice Armstrong - Balk & Brown - Leon Balk - Bodom and Hawley - Hjalmar Bodom - Bridgman & Robbins - Otto Brown

Bexhill Photographers  A - B

Bexhill Photographers  (C - D) William Morris Crouch (The Sackville Studio) - John B. Currie - The Devonshire Studio

Bexhill Photographers  C - D

Bexhill Photographers  (E - H) Edgar Gael - Alfred Harding - A. D. Hellier - John Hicks - P.H.Hilson

Bexhill Photographers  E - H

Bexhill Photographers  (J ) Joseph William Jacklett (J. W. Jacklette) - Bertha Duke (later Mrs Bertha Jacklett)  Mrs J. W. Jacklett 

Bexhill Photographers  J

Bexhill Photographers  (J - O)  J. J. Jarrett - J. W. Jarrett - Miss M. Jarrett

Bexhill Photographers  J - O

Bexhill Photographers  (P- Q) J. J. Payne - J. Perry - Arthur Bruges Plummer

Bexhill Photographers  P - Q

Bexhill Photographers  (R - T)

William J. Reed - Thomas Robbins - Robson - Sackville Studio (W. M. Crouch) - Leonard Snelling - James E. Stanborough - George E. Swain - Charles Ash Talbot

Bexhill Photographers  R - T

Bexhill Photographers  (V -Z)

Emil Vieler - Herbert Vieler - J & E Wheeler 

Bexhill Photographers  V - Z

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