Hastings Photographers -Godbold

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Professional Photographers in Hastings - Henry J. Godbold

Henry James GODBOLD (born 1842, Islington, London)

[ABOVE] A portrait of the Hastings photographer Henry James Godbold (1842-1927). This photograph was taken at Godbold & Co.'s studio at 25 White Rock Place around 1891, when Henry Godbold was approaching fifty.

[PHOTO : Courtesy of Peter Francis of Lingfield]

[ABOVE] Trade plate of  Messrs. Godbold & Co. taken from the back of a carte-de-visite portrait photographed at Edwin Whiteman's Bookshop, 52 High Street, Hastings. ( c1866)

[ABOVE] Trade plate of Henry J. Godbold, Artist-Photographer, 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards-on-Sea (c1873)

[ABOVE] A portrait of the Hastings photographer Henry James Godbold (1842-1927), a detail from a group portrait of the Godbold family photographed around 1893.

[PHOTO : Courtesy of Peter Francis of Lingfield]

Henry James Godbold was born in Islington in North London on 14th May 1842, the son of John Godbold and Lucy Eyles. Henry's father John Godbold was born in London in 1815 and had married Lucy Eyles in Islington in 1838. Henry James Godbold was John and Lucy Godbold's third child. Henry's siblings included Charles Thomas (born 1839, Islington), Elizabeth (born 1840, Islington), Lucy Jane Lucretia (born 1844, Islington), Mary Ann (born 1846, Islington - died 1846), George William (born 1847, Islington) and John Godbold (born 1850, Camberwell, London). At the time of the 1881 census. Henry's father John Godbold is recorded as a "Broker's Agent" and is shown living with Mrs Sarah Godbold (born c1837 Hertford), presumably his second wife.

When the 1861 census was taken on 7th April, eighteen year old Henry Godbold was residing at 5 Barnsbury Street, Islington and working as a photographer. On 6th May 1864, at Christ Church, Highbury, Henry James Godbold married Emma Matilda Cross (born 1838, Clerkenwell, London), the daughter of Hugh McIntosh Cross, a London bookseller. At the time of his marriage, Henry Godbold was living at 4 Barnsbury Street, Islington and was employed by The London School of Photography, a large and successful firm of portrait photographers with a half dozen studios in London and branch studios in Liverpool and Manchester. The proprietor of The London School of Photography during this period was Samuel Prout Newcombe (1824-1912). Samuel Prout Newcombe's younger brother Charles Thomas Newcombe (born 1830, Hoxton, London, Middlesex) was a professional photographer who ran two portrait studios in London. In May 1863, Charles Thomas Newcombe opened a branch establishment at 22 White Rock Place, Hastings. Charles Newcombe's decision to establish a branch studio in Hastings might have encouraged Henry Godbold to move from London to Hastings.

[ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait of a seated woman by Henry J. Godbold, 2 Robertson Street, Hastings. Negative No.2023. ( c1866) [ABOVE] Trade plate of Henry J. Godbold, Artist Photographer, 2 Robertson Street, Hastings as shown on the reverse of the carte-de-visite portrait shown on the left. Negative No.2023. ( c1866)

By the Summer of 1865, Henry Godbold and his wife were living in Hastings, where their first child, Edith Emma Godbold was born during the 3rd Quarter of 1865. Around this time Henry Godbold took over an established studio at 2 Robertson Street, Hastings. (The photographic studio of  H. J. Godbold at 2 Robertson Street is listed in R.Simpson & Co.'s Hastings & St Leonards Directory of 1865 ). By September 1866, Henry Godbold had formed the firm of Godbold & Co and was operating a branch studio at the business premises of Edwin Whiteman (1834-1876), a bookseller who ran Whiteman's Library at 52 High Street, Hastings.

[ABOVE] An advertisement placed in The Hastings & St Leonards News by Henry James Godbold, photographer of 2 Robertson Street, Hastings (11th May 1866).

[RIGHT] An advertisement which appeared in the The Hastings & St Leonards News announcing the opening of Godbold & Co.'s branch studio at Whiteman's Library, 52 High Street, Hastings in the Summer of 1866.

[ABOVE] Advertisement for Godbold & Co.'s branch studio at Whiteman's Library, 52 High Street, Hastings.placed in The Hastings & St Leonards News on 28th September 1866

Early in 1867, Henry and Emma Godbold's second daughter, Adela Jane Godbold was born. [Birth registered in Hastings during the First Quarter of 1867]. The following year the couple became parents to a baby boy, Arthur Douglas Godbold [Birth registered in Hastings during the 2nd Quarter of 1868]. Henry and Emma Godbold's fourth child, a daughter named Winifred Maud Godbold arrived during the 3rd Quarter of 1869.

The arrangement whereby a photographer from Godbold & Co. took photographic portraits at Whiteman's Library lasted until the early summer of 1868. By June 1868, Edwin Whiteman was employing the services of Mr J. T. Lane, a photographer from the London firm of Gush & Ferguson, to manage the photographic portrait studio situated in his bookshop. From the middle of 1868 to 1869, Godbold operated solely from his studio at 2 Robertson Street, Hastings. In addition to cartes-de-visite and cabinet photographic portraits, Godbold produced stereoscopic and album views of Hastings, St. Leonards, and the surrounding neighbourhood. Henry Godbold also took his camera to special outdoor events, making a pictorial record of public meetings, sporting events and civic celebrations. ( See H. J. Godbold's Outdoor Photography below)

Charles Thomas Newcombe operated a branch studio at 22 White Rock Place, Hastings until the end of 1865. A few doors away from Newcombe's Hastings studio in White Rock Place was a "Fancy Bazaar" run by William Ashdown and his wife, assisted by their son Henry and daughter Margaret. William Ashdown's son, Henry William Ashdown (born 1844, St Pancras, London) took over Newcombe's photographic studio in 1866. Less than three years later, Henry William Ashdown left Hastings for London. Ashdown established a studio at 1 Waverley Place, St John's Road, in North West London and over the next twenty years pursued his photographic career in London. In 1869, Henry Godbold closed his studio in Robertson Street and moved into Charles Newcombe's former studio at 22 White Rock Place, which had recently been vacated by Henry Ashdown. The studio at 22 White Rock Place was well situated on the seafront near Hastings Pier, but in 1869 Godbold was flanked by the studios of a number of competing photographers - Frederick Treble at 21 White Rock Place, James Bayfield at 25 White Rock Place and the fashionable studio of Boning & Small at 10 Verulam Place. In 1870, Henry Godbold decided to move further along the coast to the neighbouring seaside resort of St. Leonards-on-Sea.

[ABOVE] An advertisement placed in The Hastings & St Leonards Observer of 31st December 1870 which advised the public that the photographer Henry James Godbold had removed from his studio at 22 White Rock Place, Hastings to a new establishment at 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards-on-Sea. Godbold's Notice of Removal had first appeared in local newspapers some nine months earlier in April 1870.
 

In April 1870, Henry Godbold placed a "Notice of Removal" in the local press, announcing that "Mr. Godbold, Artist Photographer, has removed from White Rock Place to 8 GRAND PARADE, ST. LEONARDS," adding that "all Negatives taken by Messrs, Ashdown and Newcombe are removed to Grand Parade, where copies can be obtained." Henry Godbold was to operate a photographic portrait studio at 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards for the next twenty years.

Carte-de-visite portraits by Henry James Godbold of 2 Robertson Street, Hastings

[ABOVE] The reverse of a carte-de-visite portrait showing the trade plate of Henry J. Godbold, Artist Photographer, 2 Robertson Street, Hastings. Negative No.8507. ( c1866) [ABOVE] A full-length portrait of an unknown woman by Henry J. Godbold, 2 Robertson Street, Hastings. Negative No.1193. ( c1865) [ABOVE] The reverse of the carte-de-visite portrait pictured on the left, showing the trade plate of Henry J. Godbold, Artist Photographer, 2 Robertson Street, Hastings. Negative No.1193. ( c1865)

H. J. Godbold's Outdoor Photography

[ABOVE] A photograph by Henry J. Godbold showing the Liberal Party hustings at the Central Cricket Ground in Hastings during the General Election of 1865. The candidates for the parliamentary election were nominated at these large public meetings and the prospective Members of Parliament addressed the electors from the covered wooden platform or "husting". Following these open-air hustings, the Liberal candidate George Waldegrave-Leslie (1825-1904) was elected M.P. for Hastings and served the town until his retirement in 1868. [ABOVE] Nomination Day in Hastings at the time of the General Election of 1865, photographed by Henry J. Godbold. The above photograph shows the Conservative Party hustings which took place in another part of the Central Cricket Ground. The gathered voters nominated the sitting M. P. Patrick Robertson as the Conservative candidate. Patrick Robertson entered Parliament in July 1852 and served as M. P. for Hastings until 1868.

[ABOVE] Henry J. Godbold's photograph of the prize giving at a meeting of the Society of St Leonards Archers (The Queen's St Leonards Archers) in the Summer of 1865. The  Society of St Leonards Archers was founded in August 1833 by two sisters, Eliza and Charlotte Mackay. The Mackay sisters were friends of James Burton (1761-1837), the creator and builder of the St Leonards seaside resort, who provided an Archery Ground in the garden area behind the original St Leonards parish church. The Society of St Leonards Archers became known as The Queen's St Leonards Archers on the accession of Queen Victoria in 1837. Archery was one of the few sporting activities in which women could participate alongside men. A Grand Prize Meeting was held at the Archery Grounds each year in August, when members of the archery society could shoot for special prizes and banners. In 1865, Henry Godbold was present to record the Annual Grand Prize Meeting of the St Leonards Archers. According to reports in the local press, five hundred spectators gathered on the Archery Grounds to watch over forty archers compete at the Annual Grand Prize Meeting of 1865. The site of the Archery Grounds is now occupied by Hastings College of Arts & Technology in Archery Road, St. Leonards.

[ABOVE] This advertisement for Henry Godbold, Photographer of 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards-on-Sea, which appeared in the 1870 edition of The Post Office Directory of Sussex, clearly states that Godbold would attend "any part of the Kingdom to take photographs of Wedding and Family Groups; Gentlemen's Houses and Estates ; Horses, Cattle, Dogs, &c."

H. J. Godbold's Outdoor Photography

Although photographic portraits taken at his studios in Hastings and St Leonards provided Henry Godbold with his main source of income, he did occasionally venture outside his studio to take photographs on location. When he first arrived in Hastings in 1865, Henry Godbold attended a number of important public events with his camera, including the political hustings during the General Election of 1865 and the Grand Prize Meeting of the Society of St Leonards Archers (See the photographs above and at left). During this period, Henry Godbold also took a number of photographic views of Hastings, St Leonards and the surrounding area and published these scenes as stereoscopic slides and album photographs ( See H. J. Godbold's Views of Hastings & St Leonards below ). The publicity on the reverse of his stereoscopic views issued in the mid-1860s states that H. J. Godbold photographed "Views, Country Houses, Wedding and other Parties". Later advertisements and surviving examples of his work show that Henry Godbold practised "outdoor photography" over his thirty-five year career in Hastings and St Leonards.

[ABOVE] An outdoor wedding group photograph produced by the firm of Godbold & Co. of Hastings in 1897. This wedding party was gathered together to celebrate the marriage of Henry J. Godbold's youngest son, Percy Reginald Godbold (born 1872) to Dora Harris. [PHOTO : Courtesy of Peter Francis of Lingfield]

 

Carte-de-visite portraits by Henry James Godbold of 22 White Rock Place, Hastings

[ABOVE] The reverse of the carte-de-visite portrait pictured on the right, showing the trade plate of Henry J. Godbold, Artist & Photographer, 22 White Rock Place, Hastings. Negative No.9276. (c1869) [ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait of a seated woman holding a book by Henry J. Godbold, Artist & Photographer, 22 White Rock Place, Hastings. Negative No.9276. (c1869) [ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait of a young woman reading a book by Henry J. Godbold, Artist Photographer, 22 White Rock Place, Hastings. Negative No.8974. (c1869)
 

Henry J. Godbold's Studio at 22 White Rock Place, Hastings

White Rock Place is situated on Hastings seafront between Eversfield Place and Verulam Place in the west and Robertson Street and Carlisle Parade in the east. Originally, 'The White Rock' was a natural feature on the seafront and was used as a gun emplacement during the Napoleonic War. Between 1834 and 1835, the cliffs near White Rock were levelled and a new coast road was made, including a stretch which became known as White Rock Place. Given the prime location of White Rock Place, the buildings that overlooked the seafront were soon populated by seaside lodging houses and businesses that catered for visitors and holiday makers. Unsurprisingly, White Rock Place became a favourite location for portrait photographers.

In April 1863, Charles Thomas Newcombe, a well known London photographer with studios in London's Regent Street and Fenchurch Street, opened a photographic portrait studio at 22 White Rock Place, Hastings. A few years later, in 1866, C. T. Newcombe closed his Hastings branch and sold the studio at 22 White Rock Place to Henry William Ashdown, the twenty-two year old son of William Ashdown, the proprietor of a 'fancy bazaar' at 29 White Rock Place. Newcombe's former studio manager, Robert Nayler, opened his own establishment next door at 21 White Rock Place, Hastings.

When Henry Ashdown left Hastings in 1869 to set up a photographic portrait studio in St John's Wood, London, the studio at 22 White Rock Place, Hastings was acquired by Henry James Godbold. Flanked by a number of competitors in White Rock Place, Henry Godbold, after only a year at the White Rock studio, decided to sell his business at No. 22 to Ainslie Harwood of the Hastings Photographic Company. Henry Godbold moved further along the coast to the neighbouring seaside resort of St. Leonards-on-Sea, where he established a new studio at 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards.

[ABOVE] The trade plate of  Charles Thomas Newcombe,  Photographer, 22 White Rock Place, Hastings (c1864). [ABOVE] The trade plate of  photographer Henry Ashdown, 22 White Rock Place, Hastings (c1868).

[ABOVE] The trade plate of  Henry J. Godbold' Artist Photographer of  22 White Rock Place, Hastings (c1869).

[ABOVE] White Rock Place, Hastings, photographed around the time Henry James Godbold was operating a photographic portrait studio at No.22 White Rock Place. Henry Godbold's studio premises is at the far end of this parade of shops , immediately to the right of the group of men in the left-hand corner of the picture. In 1869, this parade of buildings contained a number of photographic portrait studios, including Frederick Treble No. 21, Henry J. Godbold at No.22, and James S. Bayfield at No. 25 White Rock Place. In 1870, Henry Godbold left White Rock Place for 8 Grand Parade, St. Leonards-on-Sea. Around 1889, Henry Godbold returned to White Rock Place to take over the photographic portrait studio at No.25 White Rock.

[ABOVE] A nineteenth century map of Hastings showing White Rock Place at the western end of the seafront and Robertson Street, where Henry Godbold's first studio was located, running diagonally across the centre of the town. [Detail from an 1859 map of central Hastings].

 

H. J. Godbold's Photographic Views of Hastings & St Leonards and the Surrounding Neighbourhood

 

[ABOVE] A stereoscopic view of St Helen's Wood by Henry J. Godbold, Photographer, 2 Robertson Street, Hastings (c1865)

[ABOVE] The reverse of  a stereoscopic view by Henry J. Godbold  of 2 Robertson Street, Hastings, listing the subjects available as stereoscopic slides and album photographs (c1865). The full list of subjects is reproduced in the table on the right.

H. J. Godbold's Views of Hastings & St Leonards

In addition to studio portrait photography, Henry Godbold took photographic views of Hastings, St Leonards and the surrounding neighbourhood. Godbold issued these views as stereoscopic slides and album photographs. Godbold charged one shilling for each stereoscopic slide. Album views cost sixpence each. Henry Godbold's photographic views could be purchased at local booksellers and from branches of the London School of Photography, Godbold's former employer.

 
[BELOW] The list of places photographed by Henry J. Godbold which were issued as stereoscopic views and album photographs during 1865. The "album" photographs were small albumen prints the same size as carte-de-visite portraits
 

GODBOLD'S STEREOSCOPIC AND ALBUM PHOTOGRAPHS OF

HASTINGS, ST LEONARD'S AND NEIGHBOURHOOD

Albert Memorial   Bodiam Castle   Dripping Well   Ore
The Arcades   Herstmonceux Castle   Ecclesbourne Glen   The Parades
St Leonards Archery Grounds   Camber Castle   Fairlight Glen   Pett
St Leonards Assembly Rooms   Pevensey Castle    Fish Market   Railway Stations
Battle Abbey   The Caves   Fish Ponds (Ecclesbourne)   Winchelsea
Beauport   Cemetery   St Leonards Gardens    
Bexhill   All the Chapels   Hastings - from various points   And many other various Streets, Places & Houses are in preparation

 

 

Bohemia   All the Churches   Hollington Church  
Bulverhythe   The Conqueror's Table   All the Hotels  
Hastings Castle   Crowhurst   The Lovers' Seat  
 

Carte-de-visite portraits by Henry James Godbold of 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards-on-Sea

[ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait of a woman with a flower basket, photographed by Henry J. Godbold, Artist-Photographer, 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards-on-Sea . Negative No.13,568. (c1876) [ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait of a girl and a younger child photographed by Henry J. Godbold, Artist Photographer, 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards-on-Sea. (c1877) [ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait of a young child photographed by Henry J. Godbold, Artist - Photographer, 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards-on-Sea. Negative No.14,983. (c1877)

[ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait of a young child photographed by Henry J. Godbold, Artist Photographer, 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards-on-Sea . Negative No.15,796. (c1878) [ABOVE] The reverse of the carte-de-visite portrait showing the trade plate of Henry J. Godbold, Artist- Photographer, 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards-on-Sea. (c1875) [ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait of a young man photographed by Henry James Godbold, Artist-Photographer, 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards-on-Sea. Negative No.13,438. (c1876)

[ABOVE] The reverse of the carte-de-visite portrait pictured above showing the trade plate of Henry J. Godbold, Artist- Photographer, 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards-on-Sea. Negative No.15,796. (c1878) [ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait of a woman holding a flower, photographed by Henry J. Godbold, Artist-Photographer, 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards-on-Sea. (c1880) [ABOVE] The reverse of  a carte-de-visite portrait showing the trade plate of Henry J. Godbold, Artist-Photographer, 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards-on-Sea. Negative No.16,924. (c1880)
 

Henry James Godbold at St Leonards-on-Sea

[ABOVE] An advertisement for Mr. Godbold, Artist Photographer of 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards-on-Sea, which appeared in the Post Office Directory of Sussex, published in 1870.

[ABOVE] A Victorian photograph showing the seafront at St Leonards-on-Sea. Henry James Godbold operated a photographic studio from his private residence at 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards-on-Sea for twenty years between 1870 and 1890.

 

1871 CENSUS : 8 Grand Parade, ST LEONARDS-ON-SEA, SUSSEX

NAME

 

OCCUPATION

AGE

PLACE OF BIRTH

Henry James GODBOLD

Head

Artist. Watercolours. Photography

28

Islington, Middlesex
Emma GODBOLD

Wife

  30 Islington, Middlesex
Edith GODBOLD

daughter

  5 Hastings, Sussex
Adela  GODBOLD

daughter

  4 Hastings, Sussex
Arthur GODBOLD

son

  3 Hastings, Sussex
Winifred M. GODBOLD

daughter

  1 Hastings, Sussex
Charles Henry GODBOLD

son

  8 months Hastings, Sussex
Lucy GODBOLD

Sister

Photographer's Asst. (Photographic Painter)

25

Islington, Middlesex

[ABOVE] Extract from the 1871 Census Return giving details of Henry James Godbold and his family at 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards-on-Sea. Five household servants were also listed at the Godbold residence. Although Henry Godbold conducted his photographic business from 8 Grand Parade, it was also the family home. Advertisements for Godbold's photographic studio published in the 1870s describe 8 Grand Parade as a "Private House near The Archway". The St Leonards Archway on Grand Parade was built in 1828 to mark the entrance to the seaside resort created by the architect and builder James Burton (1761-1837). The Archway was erected to mark the boundary between St Leonards-on-Sea and the seaside town of Hastings to the east. Lucy Jane Lucretia Godbold (1844-1913), Henry Godbold's younger sister, assisted her brother in his photography business in the mid 1860s and early 1870s. When Henry Godbold's eldest daughter Edith was old enough to assist her father, Miss Lucy Godbold went to live with her youngest brother John Godbold (1850-1925) in Wiltshire.
 

Henry James Godbold - Photographer at 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards-on-Sea

[ABOVE] The reverse of  a cabinet portrait showing the trade plate of Henry J. Godbold, Artist - Photographer, 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards-on-Sea. (c1879). The printed printed publicity refers to Henry Godbold's "Honorable Mention" at the Paris Exhibition of 1878 for his photographic portrait miniatures painted on china.

[PHOTO : Courtesy of Peter Francis of Lingfield]

[ABOVE] A newspaper report of the Paris Exhibition of 1878 which notes Messrs. Godbold and Basebe as the only exhibitors from St Leonards-on-Sea. Henry Godbold and his business partner Athelstane Basebe combined forces to produce coloured photographic portraits on china cups, plates and dishes. Godbold and Basebe employed the Autotype carbon print transfer system in which photographic images could be transferred to china and porcelain. Basebe, a talented miniature painter, used his skill to hand colour the tiny china-based portraits.( The Hastings & St Leonards News, 5th May 1878 )

[ABOVE] A porcelain dish with a photographic portrait of a mother and child at its centre. The firm of Godbold & Basebe were producing similar items featuring hand-coloured photographic miniatures in 1878.

[ABOVE] Examples of photographic miniatures transferred to china cups using the Autotype process employed by Godbold and Basebe in 1878.

[ABOVE] An advertisement for Mr. H. J. Godbold, Artist Photographer, 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards-on-Sea, which appeared in the Hastings & St. Leonards Gazette on Saturday, 6th January, 1872.

In 1870, after five years in Hastings, Henry James Godbold moved further along the coast to the neighbouring seaside resort of St. Leonards-on-Sea, a relatively new housing development about a mile west from the White Rock area of Hastings. Henry Godbold, his wife Emma, and their four children moved into a  private house on the seafront at 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards. During the 3rd Quarter of 1870, Emma Godbold gave birth to a fifth child, a baby boy named Charles Henry Godbold.

Henry Godbold set up a photographic portrait studio at his new house in Grand Parade. Godbold was to operate a photographic studio at 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards for twenty-one years, from 1870 until 1891. The studio was open from 9am to 6pm each weekday. The core of Godbold's business was studio portrait photography. Portraits were taken in the small carte-de-visite format, measuring roughly 21/2 inches by 41/4 inches (6.3 cm x 10.5 cm) or in the recently introduced cabinet card format, a larger photographic portrait measuring approximately 4 1/4 inches by 6 1/2 inches (16.6 cm x 10.6 cm). Like many professional photographers of the period, Godbold offered to either enlarge the original photograph to life size or reduce the image to the size of a small miniature and then colour the resized picture with crayon, water colours or oil paint. On the 1871 census return, Henry Godbold described himself as an artist in watercolours as well as a photographer. Lucy Jane Lucretia Godbold (1844-1913), Henry Godbold's younger sister, who assisted him in his photography business was also an artist and gave her occupation as "photographic painter". From the early 1870s, Goldbold's carte-de-visite and cabinet portraits carry the printed inscription "This Portrait can be reduced for the smallest Miniature or enlarged to life size and finished in Oil, Water Colors or Crayons".

Around 1877, Henry Godbold combined forces with Athelstane Basebe (1853-1909), a London artist and photographer, a son of the well-known portrait artist and miniature painter Charles Jones Basebe (1818-1880). [See panel on the Basebe Family of Artists and Photographers below]. Athelstane Basebe, Henry Godbold's partner in the firm of Godbold & Basebe, later ran his own photographic portrait studio in East Grinstead. Godbold & Basebe perfected a technique whereby small photographic portraits were transferred to china-ware or porcelain and then painted to give the appearance of a portrait miniature. Godbold & Basebe employed the Autotype Company's carbon print transfer system. The carbon print process, whereby a photographic tissue consisting of  powdered carbon in bichromated gelatin could be transferred to a ceramic support was perfected in the mid-1860s by Sir Joseph Wilson Swan (1828-1914). Swan's patent was purchased in 1868 by the Autotype Company, which went on to improve Swan's method and manufacture ready-made carbon tissue and transfer sheets. Godbold and Basebe showed their "miniatures painted on china, with autotype basis", along with other photographic novelties such as "carbon transparent photographs for window decoration", at the Paris Exhibition of 1878. According to his later publicity, Godbold and his artist collaborator were awarded an "Honourable Mention" at the Paris Exhibition for their coloured reproductions on china. From 1878, the backs of Henry Godbold's cartes-de-visite and cabinet portraits were printed with the legend "HONOURABLE MENTION PARIS EXHIBITION 1878 - This portrait can be reduced for the smallest Miniature or enlarged to life size and finished in Oil, Water Colors or Crayons, or it can be reproduced as a Painting upon China, for which class of Picture Hon. mention was awarded at Paris".

In addition to his studio portrait work and the production of hand-coloured miniature portraits and life-size photographic portraits finished in oils, Henry Godbold also continued his interest in Outdoor Photography. Advertisements in local newspapers and trade directories state that Henry Godbold was prepared to attend "any part of the Kingdom" in order to take "photographs of Wedding and Family Groups; Gentlemen's Houses and Estates" as well as "Horses, Cattle, Dogs" and other prized pets and livestock. When he first arrived in Hastings in 1865, Henry Godbold took a series of photographic views of Hastings, St Leonards and the surrounding neighbourhood. In the 1870s, Godbold toured Hastings and St Leonards with his camera, taking photographs of notable buildings in the area. An advertisement for Mr. Godbold, Artist Photographer of 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards-on-Sea, which appeared in the Post Office Directory of Sussex, published in 1870, makes a particular reference to Godbold photographing both the interiors and exteriors of local churches. Godbold also worked as a general purpose photographer, making accurate reproductions of documents and plans and taking technical photographs of machinery etc. Godbold

According to David Webb's research into Godbold's photographic career, the photographer was declared bankrupt in Hastings on 20th May 1880. This is odd, because an advertisement in Deacon's Blue Book Guide published in 1881, gives the impression that Henry Godbold's studio at 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards-on-Sea, was flourishing. The advertisement, which outlines recent improvements at Godbold's studio in Grand Parade, includes the detail that "a new Dressing Room for Ladies has recently been added, so that when required dresses can be changed."

In the late 1870s and early 1880s, Henry Godbold became involved in a number of projects outside of his work as a professional photographer. Henry Godbold and his wife Emma were active members of The Vegetarian Society. In 1878, Mrs Emma Godbold had established a Vegetarian Boarding House at 30 Carisbrooke Road, St Leonards. A piece in the vegetarian journal "The Dietetic Reformer and Vegetarian Messenger" published on 1st January 1878, specifically mentions Mrs Godbold's Cerealia Boarding House at 30 Carisbrooke Road, St. Leonards-on-Sea. Later editions of The Vegetarian Messenger included the following notices : "Cerelia - St Leonards on Sea - A boarding-house and home for Vegetarians, where every attention is paid to the enjoyment, recovery or maintenance of health.....Cerealia is situated within five minutes of the Seafront, Railway station and delightful public gardens. House is warmly commended by many members of the Vegetarian and Food Reform Societies". By 1880, Henry Godbold had become the Honorary Secretary of the Hastings School of Science and Art, organising a course of lectures on "popular Art Subjects".

[ABOVE] A notice placed in local newspapers about the Lectures on Art at the School of Science and Art, organized by Henry J. Godbold in 1880. ( The Hastings & St Leonards Independent, 2nd January 1880). An official report on attendance at the Hastings School of Art, where H. J. Godbold served as Secretary, recorded 9 students who paid 1s 6d per month and 15 shillings per quarter to attend daytime lectures and 217 students who paid 1s 6d and 2 shillings per month to attend  Evening Classes at the Art School.

 
 

[ABOVE] A portrait miniature of Charles Hanbury, 1st Baron Sudeley, painted on ivory in 1842 by Charles J. Basebe (1818-1880). This portrait miniature measures approximately 4.5 inches by 3.5 inches (11.5cm x 9cm). Charles J. Basebe's son Athelstane Basebe (1853-1909) was also a miniature painter and exhibited miniature portraits at the Royal Academy in 1882 and 1899. Athelstane Basebe entered into a partnership with the photographer Henry James Godbold in 1878.

The Basebe Family of Miniature Portrait Painters and Photographers

Charles Jones Basebe (1818-1880) was a portrait artist and miniature painter. Born in Sussex in 1818, Charles Basebe showed artistic talent at an early age and by the time he was seventeen he was exhibiting his work in London. Charles J. Basebe became a professional artist and earned his living as a portrait painter in London and Brighton. From 1835 to 1879, Charles J. Basebe exhibited portraits and miniatures at the Society of British Artists and the Royal Academy.

Charles J. Basebe and his wife Caroline produced at least 9 children, a number of whom became artists and photographers. Their eldest son Charles Edward Basebe (born c1846, St Pancras, London) worked as a portrait painter in London and Bristol. Athelstane Basebe (born 1853, Camden Town) became a portrait painter and a photographer, operating photographic studios in London, East Grinstead, Hemel Hempstead and Watford. Harold Ernest Basebe (born 1857, St Pancras, London) was primarily a watercolour artist, but he briefly worked as a photographer in Worthing in the early 1890s. Edgar Allan Basebe (born 1860, St Pancras, London) became a photographer in Cambridgeshire and from 1901 to 1910 was a partner in the firm of Mason & Basebe, a photographic portrait studio in Market Street, Cambridge. Ethelred Basebe (aka Bertram Basebe), who was born in Camden Town early in 1868, was the youngest son of Charles and Caroline Basebe and worked as a photographer in East Grinstead and Worthing before moving to Watford where he was employed as a photographic artist in the early 1900s.

Charles J. Basebe's son Athelstane Basebe (1853-1909), a miniature painter and photographer of 199 Brompton Road, Knightsbridge, collaborated with the photographer Henry James Godbold to produce hand-coloured photographic miniatures on china-ware in 1878.

[ABOVE] A portrait miniature of George Hay Dawkins Pennant painted on ivory in 1864 by Charles J. Basebe (1818-1880).This portrait miniature measures approximately 4 inches by 3 inches (10.3cm x 7.5cm).. Charles J. Basebe's son Athelstane Basebe (1853-1909) trained as a miniature painter under his father. Athelstane 's ability to paint tiny portraits on ivory proved a useful skill when  he worked with the photographer Henry James Godbold to produce hand-coloured photographic miniatures on china-ware in 1878.

 

1881 CENSUS : 30 Carisbrooke Road, St Leonards, Hastings, Sussex

NAME

 

OCCUPATION

AGE

PLACE OF BIRTH

Henry J. GODBOLD

Head

Photographer

38 Islington, Middlesex
Emma M. GODBOLD

Wife

  39 Islington, Middlesex
Edith E. GODBOLD

daughter

Artist

16 Hastings, Sussex
Adela J. GODBOLD

daughter

scholar 14 Hastings, Sussex
Arthur D. GODBOLD

son

scholar 13 Hastings, Sussex
Winifred M. GODBOLD

daughter

scholar 11 Hastings, Sussex
Charles H. GODBOLD

son

scholar 10 Hastings, Sussex
Percy R. GODBOLD

son

scholar 9 Hastings, Sussex
Jessie M. GODBOLD

daughter

  2 Hastings, Sussex
         
Gertrude WOODJER

Servant

Housemaid - Domestic

15 Maidstone, Kent
Emily DANIELS

Servant

Cook - Domestic

16 Godstone, Surrey
         
Clara M. VOIGT

Visitor

School Mistress - Governess

38 Weimar, Germany
         

[ABOVE] Extract from the 1881 Census Return giving details of the Family Household of Henry James Godbold at 30 Carisbrooke Road, St Leonards. The Godbold Family had moved from 8 Grand Parade to 30 Carisbrooke Road a few years earlier. By 1878, Mrs Emma Godbold, Henry's wife, was running "a boarding-house and home for vegetarians" at 30 Carisbrooke Road, St Leonards. Mrs Godbold's "Vegetarian Boarding House" in Carisbrooke Road went under the name of  "Cerealia" and was advertised in Vegetarian journals during the late 1870s. Advertisements for the vegetarian boarding-house at "Cerealia", 30 Carisbrooke Road state that it was within "five minutes walk" of the Railway Station.

Henry J. Godbold (1842-1927)

Emma M. Godbold (1838-1924)

Edith Emma Godbold (born 1865)

Adela Jane Godbold (born 1867)

Arthur D. Godbold (1868-1913)

Winifred  Godbold (born 1869)

Charles H. Godbold (born 1870)

Percy R. Godbold (born 1872)

Jessie M. Godbold (born 1878)

To view more photographs of Henry Godbold and his Family, click on the link below

The Godbold Family Album

Portrait Photography at  the studio of Henry James Godbold at 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards-on-Sea

[ABOVE] A cabinet portrait of Miss Florence Patton-Bethune photographed by Henry James Godbold at 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards-on-Sea. (1888). Florence Patton-Bethune  was the only daughter of General Walter Douglas Phillipps Patton-Bethune of The Highland Light Infantry Regiment. Anne Florence Louise Mary Patton-Bethune was a promising writer, but she died on 14th April 1894 at the age of twenty-nine, soon after the publication of her adventure novel "Bachelor to the Rescue". Miss Patton-Bethune holds a fan and wears an elaborately decorated dress. It is likely that this twenty three year old lady made use of the "Ladies' Dressing Room", which had been added to Mr Godbold's studio premises at 8 Grand Parade in 1880. (See the advertisement for H. J. Godbold's studio, taken from Deacon's Blue Book Guide of 1881, opposite).

[ RIGHT] An advertisement for Mr. H. J. Godbold's photographic portrait studio at 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards-on-Sea, which appeared in the advertisement supplement of Deacon's Blue Book Guide, published in 1881. Godbold's advertisement details some of the improvements in portrait photography which had followed the introduction of Instantaneous Photography during the 1870s. The Instantaneous Process, with its shortened exposure times ("Greater rapidity - Instantaneous ...the reduction to a mere fraction of time"), abandonment of posing equipment ( "No fixing the Head ....sitters can now be Photographed without needing a head-rest"), the replacement of the chemicals associated with the old wet collodion process ("No smell of Chemicals - all chemicals having an odour have been banished from the Studio") and the employment of modern cameras with mechanical shutters ("the assistance of an electrical or pneumatic method of exposing the prepared plate"), ensured that photographic portraits had "greater naturalness of expression" and transformed a "tedious ordeal into a pleasurable relaxation".

[ABOVE] An advertisement for Mr. H. J. Godbold, Artist Photographer, 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards-on-Sea, which appeared in Deacon's Blue Book Guide (1881).

 

Henry James Godbold - Founder Member of the Hastings & St. Leonards Photographic Society

 

[ABOVE] A notice announcing a public meeting to discuss the formation of the Hastings and St Leonards Photographic Society, which was held at the School of Art, Claremont, Hastings, on 22nd October 1888. (The Hastings & St. Leonards News, 19th October 1888)

 

[ABOVE] An extract from a newspaper report on the Inaugural Meeting of the Hastings and St Leonards Photographic Society, which was held on 22nd October 1888. This extract quotes a contribution made at the meeting by local photographer Henry Godbold. The majority of the members of the Photographic Society were amateurs, but there were at least a dozen professional photographers involved in the Society during the first year of its existence.  The Hastings & St. Leonards News, 26th October 1888)

In 1888, Henry James Godbold, together with several other local professional photographers and a large number of amateurs, was involved in the setting up of the Hastings & St Leonards Photographic Society. The majority of the members of the Hastings & St Leonards Photographic Society were amateurs, but amongst their ranks were a number of local professional photographers including John Wesley Thomas and his son William Arthur Thomas, Melancthon Moore (John Wesley Thomas's son-in-law), John H. Blomfield, George William Bradshaw, who had just taken over the Memorial Studio at 51c Robertson Street, Henry Bultz, the chief photographer at the Boning & Small studio in Verulam Place (recently acquired by Mrs Sophia Rogerson), George Pearson, James Downsborough and Charles Ash Talbot. ( A few years later, both Downsborough and Talbot established photographic studios in the neighbouring seaside resort of Bexhill-on-Sea). Another founder member of the Hastings & St Leonards Photographic Society, chemist Algernon Brooker, went on to set up a shop in Wellington Place, selling photographic materials to the amateur photographers of Hastings.

The Inaugural Meeting of the Hastings & St Leonards Photographic Society was held at the School of Art, Claremont Hastings on 22nd October 1888. Wilson Noble, Member of Parliament for Hastings from 1886 until 1895, took the Chair and presided over this first meeting of the Hastings & St Leonards Photographic Society. In his opening address to the meeting, Mr Noble advised the assembled audience that they had met together to start a Photographic Society which would consist of professional and amateur photographers and would be open to "ladies as well as gentleman" (there were at least two women present at this first meeting). Mr Noble proposed that the Society should hold regular meetings of the members to discuss technical matters, where local photographers could share their experience and knowledge of photography. He went on to suggest that the Society might hold meetings which would be open to the general public. These open public meetings would include lectures on popular aspects of photography and lantern slide shows to encourage local people to take up photography and join the Society. In addition to illustrated talks, the Society would organise annual exhibitions of photography and arrange photographic expeditions in the surrounding neighbourhood of Hastings & St Leonards. At this inaugural meeting of the Hastings & St Leonards Photographic Society, Mr Wilson Noble MP was elected President of the Society and the annual subscription was fixed at 10s 6d.

During the inaugural meeting of the Hastings & St Leonards Photographic Society, Henry Godbold sat on the platform with nine other local photographers, both amateur and professional, who had initiated the idea of a photographic society for Hastings & St Leonards. Henry Godbold made a short speech to the assembled audience of photography enthusiasts in which he discussed the good relationship between amateur and professional photographers. Godbold went on to explain why Hastings was a particularly suitable place for photography. A local newspaper reporter paraphrased Mr Godbold's views : "Hastings was a health resort, and a great many people living or staying here wanted something to occupy the mind and body. He thought there was nothing better fitted for this purpose than Photography, especially if it were combined with cycling." (From the Hastings Observer, 27th October, 1888). Henry Godbold remained on the Committee of the Hastings & St Leonards Photographic Society until he left the town in 1902.

[ABOVE] An extract from a newspaper report on the Inaugural Meeting of the Hastings and St Leonards Photographic Society, which was held on 22nd October 1888. This extract quotes a contribution made at the meeting by local photographer Henry Godbold. The majority of the members of the Photographic Society were amateurs, but there were at least a dozen professional photographers involved in the Society during the first year of its existence.  The Hastings & St. Leonards News, 26th October 1888)
 
[ABOVE LEFT] An advertisement for "Eadweard Muybridge on the Science of Animal Locomotion", one of the illustrated public lectures organized by the Hastings & St Leonards  Photographic Society in May 1890 (Hastings & St. Leonards News, 9th May, 1890). [ABOVE RIGHT] Six photographs showing a horse jumping a hurdle, from Animal Locomotion by Eadweard Muybridge (1888).

The Godbold Family and Vegetarianism

[ABOVE] A portrait of Henry Godbold's second eldest daughter Adela Jane Godbold (born 1867, Hastings), photographed around 1889, when she was in her early twenties. In 1897, Adela Godbold was an Assistant Secretary of the London Vegetarian Society. The following year Adela married Mr Darcy Wentworth, an engineer's manager. When this portrait of Adela was taken in the late 1880s, her mother, Mrs Emma Godbold was running a Vegetarian Boarding House in Carisbrooke Road, St Leonards. In the 1890s, Mrs Godbold managed another Vegetarian Boarding House at 10 & 11 Royal Terrace, St Leonards.

[PHOTO : Courtesy of Peter Francis of Lingfield]

[ABOVE] A group portrait of the three eldest Godbold sisters - (left to right) Adela Jane Godbold (born 1867), Edith Emma Godbold (born 1865) and Winifred Maud Godbold (born 1869), photographed around 1888. Edith, the eldest daughter, became an artist and assisted her father in his photographic studio between 1881 and 1891.Winnie Godbold, on the right of the picture, was very active in the Vegetarian Movement and in 1901 she was working as the Secretary of the Vegetarian Society.

[PHOTO : Courtesy of Peter Francis of Lingfield]

Henry Godbold, his wife Emma and several of their children were enthusiastic vegetarians. In the late 1870s, Henry and Emma were active members of The Vegetarian Society. In 1878, Mrs Emma Godbold set up a Vegetarian Boarding House, named Cerealia at 30 Carisbrooke Road, St Leonards. In 1884, a correspondent with the initials "M. G." wrote an enthusiastic account of Mrs Godbold's Vegetarian Boarding House in Carisbrooke Road to "The Dietetic Reformer and Vegetarian Messenger", the Journal of the Vegetarian Society : "The Home at St. Leonards; - I inquired of you lately about Mrs. Godbold's at St. Leonards. I have just returned from a fortnight' s stay there with my wife and children, and have much pleasure in reporting our complete satisfaction. Mr. and Mrs. Godbold and their interesting family unite in making one quite at home. We were really very comfortable. We were helped and strengthened in the faith by Mrs. Godbold's practical presentation of Vegetarian diet, which is most varied and tasteful. We were most gratified with our visit, and strongly advise any Vegetarian wanting a change, or any outsider wishing to try Vegetarianism, to put themselves under Mrs. Godbold's care. M. G. ". Mrs Godbold established another Vegetarian Boarding House at 10 & 11 Royal Terrace, St Leonards, in the early 1890s. Henry J. Godbold, who was also Honourable Secretary of the National Anti-Vivisection Society of Great Britain in the early 1890s, was a notable figure in the Vegetarian Movement. Henry and Emma Godbold regularly attended meetings of the Vegetarian Society and other Vegetarian organisations. For instance, Mr & Mrs Godbold both attended a gathering of the Vegetarian Federal Union in Portsmouth in May 1891.

As Henry and Emma's children reached maturity, they too became involved in promoting Vegetarianism. During 1897, Adela Jane Godbold (born 1867, Hastings) served as an Assistant Secretary to the Croydon Vegetarian Society, the London Vegetarian Society and the London Vegetarian Association. In 1900, Adela's younger sister Winifred Maud Godbold (born 1869, Hastings) authored the "Twentieth Century Cookery Book", a collection of 80 different vegetarian recipes and went on to become the Secretary of the Vegetarian Society.

 

Henry James Godbold moves back to White Rock Place, Hastings

[ABOVE] The reverse of  a cabinet portrait of  Henry James Godbold, produced around the time the firm of Godbold & Co. moved from 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards-on-Sea to 25 White Rock, Hastings. This card mount was probably used for Henry Godbold's personal photographs as the name of the studio has been wrongly printed as "H. G. Godbold & Co." instead of the correct  "H. J. Godbold & Co."

[PHOTO : Courtesy of Peter Francis of Lingfield]

 

 

 
Henry J. Godbold's Instantaneous Photography

[ABOVE] The reverse of  a cabinet portrait photograph showing the trade plate of Henry J. Godbold, 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards-on-Sea. and at 25 White Rock, Hastings (c1889). This version of the back design was used on the backs of photographs issued from the St Leonards branch studio in Grand Parade. The words "Instantaneous Photography" appeared on the reverse of Godbold's cartes-de-visite and cabinet portraits from around 1878 onwards. [ABOVE] The reverse of  a cabinet portrait photograph showing the trade plate of Henry J. Godbold, 25 White Rock, Hastings, and at 8 Grand Parade, St Leonards-on-Sea (c1890). This version of the back design was used on the backs of photographs issued from the Hastings branch studio in White Rock.

[PHOTO : Courtesy of Peter Francis of Lingfield]

 Instantaneous Photography

 

 
Henry J. Godbold's Photographs of Shipwrecks, High Waves and Stormy Seas

[ABOVE] High waves in front of the Hastings Lifeboat House in Marine Parade photographed by Henry J. Godbold (c1888)

[PHOTO : Courtesy of Peter Francis of Lingfield]

In 1884, at the 29th Annual Exhibition of the Photographic Society of Great Britain, Henry Godbold exhibited nine photographs, at least four of which featured crashing waves and stormy seas, including "Old Hastings during a South West Gale";  "Break, Break, Break, on thy cold grey stones, O Sea " - a title  taken from the famous Alfred Tennyson poem, and "By the sad sea waves", a popular Victorian song composed by Jules Benedict (1804-1885).

On 11th November 1891, a number of sea vessels got into difficulties on the Sussex coast during a great storm. Henry Godbold went down to the beach with his camera to record the stricken ships. A large three-masted German barque named the "J. C. Pfluger" was driven ashore and became stranded on the beach at St Leonards. The ship's twenty-four crew members were rescued by Coastguards using a line attached to a rocket (known as Breeches Buoy Rescue  Equipment). During the same storm, a schooner named the "Nerissa", which was on its way to Norway, was wrecked on Hastings beach. Henry James Godbold took photographs of both incidents and five days later later he registered the copyright of the photographs with The Stationers' Company in London. The copyright registration forms describe the photographs as follows : 1/406/469 - "Photograph of a vessel (named the 'J. C. Pfluger') stranded at St Leonards-on-Sea, Nov 11th 1891, with rocket flying through the air to rescue the crew". 1/406/470 - "Photograph of a vessel (named the 'Nerissa') wrecked at Hastings, Nov 11th 1891, showing sea breaking over her". Copyright owner and author of both works: Henry James Godbold, 11 Royal Terrace, St Leonards on Sea. (Registration stamp: 16 November 1891). Henry Godbold exhibited a bromide print entitled "A Rocket to the Rescue", probably a version of the St Leonards rescue incident, at the Thirty-Seventh Annual Exhibition of the Royal Photographic Society in 1892.

Henry Godbold continued to take dramatic photographs of rough weather at Hastings and St Leonards throughout the last decade of his photographic career. In 1897, Henry Godbold exhibited a photograph called "Rough Sea at St Leonards" and around 1900 he published a picture showing great waves crashing down on the promenade at Hastings (see below).

[ABOVE] Rough Sea at St Leonards, a photograph by Henry J. Godbold (c1897)

[PHOTO : Courtesy of Peter Francis of Lingfield]

[ABOVE] A view of  waves crashing down on the promenade at Beach Terrace, Hastings by Henry J. Godbold (c1900)

[PHOTO : Courtesy of Peter Francis of Lingfield]

 

Lightning at Hastings

In 1896, the Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society made a reference "Lightning at Hastings", a dramatic photograph taken by H. J. Godbold on 6th July 1894. This photograph of a lightning flash at Hastings was registered for copyright at The Stationers' Company. The text of the copyright registration form reads : 1/417/281 - "Photograph of simultaneous triple lightning flash, July 6th 1894." Annotated 'Simultaneous triple lightning flash, 6 July 1894, H J Godbold, photo'. Copyright owner and author of work: Henry James Godbold, 11 Royal Terrace, St Leonards on Sea, Sussex. Date: 1894."

[ABOVE] Lightning photographed by A. H. Binden in 1888

Henry James Godbold at 38 White Rock, Hastings

[ABOVE] A photograph showing the business premises of Hastings photographer Henry James Godbold at 38 White Rock, Hastings(c1900). Henry Godbold's photographic studio was situated above Elias David Cima's Swiss Creamery & Restaurant. Elias Cima, who was born in Switzerland around 1855, ran the Swiss Restaurant at White Rock with his English wife Mathilda from the late 1890s until about 1910. Next door, at No. 39 White Rock, was the shop of John Atterbury, Manufacturing Jeweller & Siversmith. On the left hand side of this photograph is The Bolshaw Arcade, named after Albert Ernest Bolshaw, a homeopathic chemist who had a store at No.37 White Rock. [PHOTO : Courtesy of Peter Francis of Lingfield]

DATES

STUDIO & HOME ADDRESSES

1865-1868 2 Robertson Street, HASTINGS [STUDIO]
1865-1868 2 Robertson Street, HASTINGS [HOME]
1866-1867 52 High Street, HASTINGS  [STUDIO]
1869-1870 22 White Rock Place, HASTINGS [STUDIO]
1869-1870 22 White Rock Place, HASTINGS [HOME]
1870-1891 8 Grand Parade, ST. LEONARDS [STUDIO]
1870-1878 8 Grand Parade, ST. LEONARDS [HOME]
1878-1890 30 Carisbrooke Road, ST. LEONARDS [HOME]
1889-1895 25 White Rock, HASTINGS [STUDIO]
1895-1902 38 White Rock, HASTINGS [STUDIO]
1891-1902 10-11 Royal Terrace, ST. LEONARDS [HOME]
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Henry James Godbold at 38 White Rock, Hastings

 In 1895, Henry Godbold exhibited a platinum photographic print entitled "Yes or No", priced at 3 3s 0d, at the 40th Annual Exhibition of the Royal Photographic Society.

 

  A detail from the photograph above, showing the business premises of Hastings photographer Henry James Godbold at 38 White Rock, Hastings. Henry Godbold's photographic studio was situated above Elias David Cima's Swiss Creamery & Restaurant. [PHOTO : Courtesy of Peter Francis of Lingfield]
 

The Photographic Studios of Henry James Godbold and Arthur Douglas Godbold

 

STUDIO NAME

STUDIO ADDRESS

DATES

Henry James GODBOLD  & Co. 2 Robertson Street, HASTINGS   1865-1868
Henry James GODBOLD 52 High Street, HASTINGS 1866-1867
GODBOLD &  Co    2 Robertson Street & 52 High Street, HASTINGS

1866-1867

Henry James GODBOLD 22 White Rock Place, HASTINGS

1869-1870

Henry James GODBOLD  8 Grand Parade, ST. LEONARDS-ON-SEA

1870-1891

GODBOLD & BASEBE  8 Grand Parade, ST. LEONARDS-ON-SEA

1878

Henry James GODBOLD  8 Grand Parade, ST. LEONARDS-ON-SEA & 25 White Rock, HASTINGS

1889-1890

Henry James GODBOLD 25 White Rock, HASTINGS

1889-1895

H. J. GODBOLD & CO 25 White Rock Place, HASTINGS

1891-1894

Henry James GODBOLD & Co. 25 White Rock, HASTINGS & 38 White Rock, HASTINGS

1894

Henry James GODBOLD & Co. 38 White Rock, HASTINGS

1894-1903

Henry James GODBOLD 38 White Rock, HASTINGS

1894-1896

Henry James GODBOLD 3 White Rock Gardens, HASTINGS

1899-1900

   

 

Henry James GODBOLD & Son 74 Baker Street, London

1903

(Arthur) Douglas GODBOLD 74 Baker Street, London

1904

     
 
 Arthur Douglas Godbold and Henry James Godbold in London

[ABOVE] A cabinet portrait of Arthur Douglas Godbold (1868-1913), the eldest son of the Hastings photographer Henry James Godbold, taken at the London studio of  W. S. Bradshaw & Sons (c1892 ) Arthur Douglas Godbold became a professional photographer like his father. When this portrait was taken, Arthur Godbold was working at the London studio of William Stephen Bradshaw (1833-1915), a veteran photographer who had acquired the former studio of The London School of Photography at 103 Newgate Street in 1876. William Stephen Bradshaw, with the aid of his two sons, George William Bradshaw and William James Bradshaw, also operated studios in Hastings and Pretoria, South Africa. The firm of W. S. Bradshaw & Sons had purchased Constantine Jennings' Memorial Studio at 51c Robertson Street, Hastings in 1886. W. S. Bradshaw's eldest son, George William Bradshaw (1858-1917) came down to Hastings to manage the Memorial Studio later that year and was in charge of the Hastings studio until about 1901.    [PHOTO : Courtesy of Peter Francis of Lingfield]
Arthur Douglas Godbold (born 1868, Hastings), was the eldest son of Henry James Godbold. By 1891, Arthur Douglas Godbold was working as a professional photographer in London. The 1891 census records Arthur D. Godbold as a twenty-three year old photographer residing at 7 Newman Street, near London's Oxford Street. It appears that Arthur Godbold was occasionally employed by the veteran London photographer William Stephen Bradshaw (1833-1915), the proprietor of the photographic studio at 103 Newgate Street, London, which was still generally known as The London School of Photography. In 1894, Arthur Douglas Godbold was commissioned by W. S. Bradshaw to produce a series of photographs illustrating the game of baseball. These baseball photographs were registered with the Copyright Office of the Stationers' Company in London and the registration records state that the copyright owner of the baseball series was William Stephen Bradshaw of 103 Newgate Street, London, yet the author of the work ( the photographer) is given as Arthur Douglas Godbold of Hampden House, Phoenix Street, London. Most of the photographs depict three participants in a baseball game and carry descriptive titles such as "Striker, Man at Battery & Umpire". All the photographs were registered either in the September or October of 1894.
 
[LEFT] Photographs illustrating the game of baseball (1894)

In 1894, Arthur Douglas Godbold was commissioned by the  firm of William Stephen Bradshaw of 103 Newgate Street, London, to take a series  photographs illustrating the game of baseball.

 

Apparently, Arthur Douglas Godbold was working as a freelance photographer in London during the 1890s. Early in 1894, Arthur Godbold was commissioned by the journalist and newspaper proprietor Leonard Thomas Collingridge to take a photographic portrait of Frederick Courtenay Selous (1851-1917), the famous adventurer, explorer and African big game hunter.

Around 1894, Henry James Godbold opened a second studio in White Rock, Hastings. Pike's 1894 Directory of Hastings lists Godbold & Co. with a studios at 25 White Rock and 38 White Rock. Arthur Godbold returned to Hastings to help his father run the two studios. When the census of Hastings was carried out on 31st March 1901, Arthur D. Godbold was recorded as an unmarried, thirty-three year old "Photographer (worker)" at 38 White Rock, Hastings.

Around 1903, Henry James Godbold closed his Hastings studios and returned to London with his wife Emma, Arthur and his twenty-four year old unmarried daughter, Jessie Mildred Godbold. Henry J. Godbold and his son Arthur entered into a business partnership and opened a photographic studio in London's Baker Street. A London trade directory of 1903 lists Henry James Godbold & Son as a photographic firm with a studio at 74 Baker Street, London. It seems likely that Henry James Godbold, who had just turned sixty, retired from the business the following year. A London trade directory of 1904, lists the proprietor of the studio at 74 Baker Street as Douglas Godbold. Around 1906, Arthur Douglas Godbold passed the studio at 74 Baker Street to the photographer Miss Rita Martin and began a new career as a photographic journalist. Arthur went to work for The Photographic Monthly, the successor of the photographic periodical The Photogram (1894-1905) edited by Henry Snowden Ward (1865-1911). When the 1911 census was taken, Arthur Douglas Godbold gave his occupation "Editor of The Photographic Monthly". Arthur is recorded on the census return as a single man of forty-three, living with his parents and sister Jessie at 6 Loris Road, South Hammersmith, London. Arthur's father, Henry James Godbold, is described on the census return as a "Retired Photographer", aged 68. Arthur's sister, Jessie Mildred Godbold, a single woman of thirty-two, was employed as a clerk in a public school at the time of the 1911 census. Later that year, Jessie was to marry Robert H. Paul.

Arthur Douglas Godbold died in Croydon, Surrey, in 1913 at the age of forty-three.
 

 

    

Henry James Godbold - The Final Chapter

[ABOVE] A portrait of Mrs Emma Godbold (1838-1924), probably photographed in the garden of their house in Croydon in the 1920s.

[PHOTO : Courtesy of Peter Francis of Lingfield]

[ABOVE] A portrait of the Hastings photographer Henry James Godbold (1842-1927) taken towards the end of his life.

 [PHOTO : Courtesy of Peter Francis of Lingfield]

By 1903, Henry James Godbold had closed his studio in Hastings and moved to London. Henry J. Godbold and his son Arthur Douglas Godbold entered into a business partnership and opened a photographic portrait studio at 74 Baker Street, London under the name of Henry James Godbold & Son. Father and son worked alongside each other for only a brief period, because Henry Godbold, who had celebrated his sixtieth birthday in May 1902, retired from the business the following year.

When the census was taken on 2nd April 1911, Henry James Godbold was recorded with his wife and two children at 6 Loris Road, South Hammersmith, London. Henry James Godbold is described on the census return as a "Retired Photographer", aged 68. Living with Henry was his seventy-year old wife, Emma, who declared she had been married to her husband for forty-six years, his unmarried daughter Jessie Mildred Godbold, a single woman of thirty-two, who was employed as a clerk in a public school, and his forty-three year old bachelor son, Arthur Douglas Godbold, who had abandoned his career as a professional photographer and was now working as the editor of the photographer's magazine, The Photographic Monthly. Henry Godbold's two other sons had left the family home some time ago. Percy Reginald Godbold, Henry and Emma's youngest son, had married in 1897 and had emigrated to South Africa. The other son, Charles Henry Godbold was living in Chorlton district of Lancashire, with his wife Susie and their little boy Charles junior. Living with Charles Godbold in West Didsbury was his eldest sister Edith Emma Godbold, who now styled her name "Edyth" and was working as an artist and  miniature painter. The second eldest daughter Adela Jane Godbold had married Mr Darcy Wentworth, an engineer's manager, in 1898 and was living in Epsom, Surrey, at the time of the 1911 census.

Jessie Mildred Godbold married Robert H. Paul in the district of Fulham during the 3rd Quarter of 1911. After Jessie left home, Henry and Emma Godbold, together with their eldest son Arthur, moved from Hammersmith to Croydon in Surrey. In 1913, just a couple of years after their removal to Croydon, Arthur Douglas Godbold died at the age of forty-three. Henry and Emma Godbold set up home at a house called "Brundish" at 35 Waddon Park Avenue, Croydon. The Godbolds remained in Croydon for a dozen years. In May 1924, Henry and Emma Godbold received a letter from Buckingham Palace congratulating the couple on their Diamond Wedding Anniversary. A few months later, during the 3rd Quarter of 1924, Mrs Emma Godbold died in Croydon, at the age of eighty-five. After the death of his wife, to whom he had been married for sixty years, Henry Godbold moved to Wiltshire, where some of his relatives lived.

Henry James Godbold died in the Amesbury district of Wiltshire in 1927, at the age of 86.

 
To view more photographs of Henry Godbold and his Family, click on the link below

The Godbold Family Album

 

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 Acknowledgements

A special thank you to Peter Francis of Lingfield for providing photographs of Henry Godbold and his Family and for providing additional information about Henry Godbold's wife and children. One of Henry Godbold's daughters married Peter Francis's great uncle and Robert H. Paul, the husband of Jessie Mildred Godbold was Peter's godfather.