Hove Photographers

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Hove Photographers (H-J)

Henry  HEYDEN

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HUNT'S STUDIO

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INNES & BATE

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John Weaver INNES

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George Amos JOHNS

                 

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Henry HEYDEN (born c1843, Hamburg, Germany - died Hove, Sussex, 1923)
Henry Heyden was born in Hamburg, Germany, around 1843. The name "Henry Heyden" was probably an anglicised version of his original German name (Heinrich Heiden ??). Henry Heyden first appears as a photographer in Sussex in the 1891 census, when he is recorded as a forty-nine year old photographer residing at 47 Grafton Road, Worthing. Long's Worthing Directory of 1892 shows the occupant of 47 Grafton Road, Worthing, as Miss Ann Holden. In 1890, Kelly's Directory of Sussex, Miss Annie Holden is listed as the proprietor of apartments at 47 Grafton Road, Worthing.

By 1892, the photographer Henry Heyden and his former landlady Annie Holden (born c1852, Billingshurst, Sussex) were living in West Brighton (Hove). Around 1892, forty year old Annie Holden gave birth to a daughter named Norah. [The birth of a "Nora Holden" was registered in the Sussex district of Steyning during the 1st Quarter of 1892]

When the 1901 census was taken, Henry Heyden, his female companion Annie, and their daughter Norah were recorded at 46 Blatchington Road, Hove. Although I cannot trace any record of a marriage between Henry Heyden and Annie Holden, the couple are entered on the census return as man and wife and Annie's daughter is listed as "Norah Heyden".
 

1901 Census: 46 Blatchington Road, Hove, Sussex

NAME

 

AGE

OCCUPATION

WHERE BORN

Henry HEYDEN Head 57 Photographer (own account at home) Germany, German Subject
Annie HEYDEN wife 49   Billingshurst, Sussex
Norah HEYDEN daughter 9   West Brighton, Sussex

[ABOVE] Henry Heyden and his family recorded at 46 Blatchington Road, Hove in the 1901 Census

Although there is evidence that Henry Heyden was living in the area of West Brighton or Hove in the early 1890s, he is not listed as the proprietor of a photographic studio in Hove until 1897. The 1897 edition of Pike's Directory of Brighton & Hove lists Henry Heyden ( wrongly printed as "H. Hoyden") as a photographer at 46 Blatchington Road, Hove. According to local street and trade directories, Henry Heyden operated the photographic portrait studio at 46 Blatchington Road, Hove, between 1897 and 1906. Henry Heyden, who would have been in his early sixties in 1906, sold his studio to Arnold & Co, who ran the studio until around 1909. By 1911, the premises at 46 Blatchington Road, Hove, was occupied by Elizabeth Jane Wright, a shop-keeper who sold fancy goods.
 

A Woman in a Headscarf (c1892), a watercolour  by painted by Henry Heyden (c1843-1923).

Henry Heyden -  The Artist

In addition to his main occupation as a studio portrait photographer, Henry Heyden was also a talented artist who worked in pencil, watercolour and oils. A collection of Henry Heyden's artworks, including charcoal drawings, watercolours and oils, dating from the early 1890s, were sold at auction in 2013. That particular collection of Heyden's artworks included local scenes around Brighton and Hove, plus portraits and caricatures.

 

I have not been able to locate Henry Heyden in the 1911 census, but presumably he remained in the Hove area after he retired as a photographer. Norah Heyden, Henry Heyden's daughter, married Henry William Breach in Hove during the 4th Quarter of 1917. The death of Henry Heyden (aged 81) was registered in the Sussex district of Steyning during the 4th Quarter of 1923.

[ABOVE] A cabinet portrait of an unknown woman, photographed by Henry Heyden of 46 Blatchington Road, Hove (c1900).
 

[ABOVE] Henry Heyden (wrongly printed as "H. Hoyden") listed as a photographer at 46 Blatchington Road, Hove, in the commercial section of Pike's 1897 Directory of Brighton & Hove.
 

Carte-de-visite Portraits by Henry Heyden of Hove

[ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait of an unknown woman, photographed by Henry Heyden of 46 Blatchington Road, Hove (c1903). [ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait of an unknown woman, photographed by Henry Heyden of 46 Blatchington Road, Hove (c1900). [ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait of an unknown woman, photographed by Henry Heyden of 46 Blatchington Road, Hove (c1900). [ABOVE] A carte-de-visite portrait of a young man, photographed by Henry Heyden of 46 Blatchington Road, Hove (c1905).
 

Cabinet Photographs by Henry Heyden of Hove

[ABOVE] A family group portrait in a a cabinet card format, photographed by Henry Heyden of 46 Blatchington Road, Hove. (c1903).

[ABOVE] Heyden's Studio at 46 Blatchington Road, Hove, listed under 'Photographic Artists' in the 1899 edition of Towner's Directory of Brighton & Hove.
 

 

[ABOVE] A cabinet card portrait of man and woman (possibly husband and wife), photographed by Henry Heyden of 46 Blatchington Road, Hove (c1905). [ABOVE] A cabinet card portrait of two women (possibly a mother and daughter) photographed by Henry Heyden of 46 Blatchington Road, Hove (c1906).  
 

HUNT'S STUDIO

 

[ABOVE] An advertisement for Hunt's Studio at 48 Western Road, Hove, which appeared in the Brighton Gazette on Thursday 27th February 1862.

John Weaver INNES (1862-1928)

INNES & BATE

John Weaver Innes was born towards the end of 1862 in Hackney, East London, the son of Ellen Jane Holland and John Innes senior, a London grocer. John Innes senior (born c1839, Wapping, London) had married Ellen Jane Holland (born c1835, Saighton, Cheshire) in the Mile End district of East London during the 3rd Quarter of 1861. John Weaver Innes, the couple's first child, was probably born in East London at the end of 1862, but his birth was not registered in Hackney until early in 1863. [The birth of John Weaver Innes was registered in the London district of Hackney during the First Quarter of 1863]. A second son, Alfred Innes was born in Romford, Essex, around 1866. By 1874, John Innes senior had established a grocery business in Lea Bridge Road in Leyton, Essex (now part of the London Borough of Waltham Forest). By the early 1880s, John Innes senior had brought his two sons into his grocery business and had opened a grocery shop in the Essex seaside town of Southend-on-Sea. The 1882 edition of Kelly's Directory of Essex records John Innes & Sons as a firm of  grocers running a shop in Southchurch Road, Southend-on-Sea. At this time, John Innes and his family were residing in nearby Prittlewell. The 1881 census records John Innes as a forty-two year old grocer living with his wife and two sons in London Close, Prittlewell, Essex. The two sons of John Innes, fifteen year old Alfred Innes and his older brother John Weaver Innes, are recorded on the 1881 census as assistants to their father. On the census return John Weaver Innes, aged 19, is described as an "Assistant to Grocer".

By 1900, John Innes senior had sold his grocery business and retired to the Sussex seaside town of Brighton. John Innes senior's eldest son, John Weaver Innes was now working as a professional photographer in Hove, but was living at his parents' home on the outskirts of Brighton.

A photographic portrait studio had been established at 36 Goldstone Villas, Hove in 1878 by photographer Henry Joseph Spink (1838-1892). After the death of Henry Joseph Spink in 1892, the Goldstone Villa studio had been managed by his sons, but around 1897, Mrs Sarah Spink, the owner of 36 Goldstone Villas, let out the studio to a local photographer named Frank Houghton Berry (born 1852, Brighton). When Mrs Sarah Spink, the owner of the Goldstone Villas studio, died in 1899, the special arrangement between Mrs Spink and Frank Berry came to an end and the photographic studio at 36 Goldstone Villas was put up for sale. It appears that John Weaver Innes acquired the photographic portrait studio at 36 Goldstone Villas, Hove in 1899. The 1900 edition of Towner's Directory of Brighton & Hove records photographer John Weaver Innes as the proprietor of the studio at 36 Goldstone Villas, Hove. Cabinet portrait photographs produced at the Goldstone Villa studio between 1899 and 1900 carry the name of J. Weaver Innes. However, in 1900, after operating alone at the Goldstone Villa studio for about a year, John Weaver Innes entered into a business partnership with Henry Bate (born 1863, Marylebone, London).

Henry Bate, John Weaver Innes' new business partner, was born in Fitzroy Square, London, in 1863, the son of Elizabeth Stapleton and Samuel Bate, an engineer and gunsmith from Devon. Henry Bate had followed his father into the gun-making business and when Samuel Bate died in 1888, at the age of 56, Henry Bate took over his father's workshop in the Essex town of Maldon. At the time of the 1891 census, Henry Bate was recorded as a "Gun & Bicycle Maker" at 11 Market Hill, Maldon, Essex. Two years later, Henry Bate married Sarah Annie Barbara Chappell (born 1871,Edmonton, Middlesex), the daughter of Mrs Sarah Chappell of Edmonton. [ The marriage of Henry Bate and Sarah Annie Chappell was registered in the Essex district of Epping during the 3rd Quarter of 1893]. Henry Bate's wife Sarah (known as "Annie") gave birth to two children - Elsie Gladys Bate (born 1894, Maldon, Essex) and Aubrey Claude Bate (born 1896, Maldon, Essex) before she moved down to Brighton with her husband around 1900.

Photographic portraits produced at the Goldstone Villas studio in the first few months of 1901 carried the trade plate of Innes & Bate, but, by early Spring, the partnership between John Weaver Innes and Henry Bate had come to an end. A notice in The London Gazette published on 31st May 1901 announced that the firm of Innes & Bate, photographers at Hove, had been dissolved by mutual consent on 25th March 1901. The photographic business at 36 Goldstone Villas, Hove was retained by Henry Bate, who remained in business as a photographer at the Goldstone Villas studio until the outbreak of the First World War.

 

[ABOVE] A view of Beaconsfield Villas, Brighton, looking north towards Preston Drove (c1907). At the time of the 1901 census, John Weaver Innes was residing with his parents at No. 36  Beaconsfield Villas in the Preston district of north Brighton.

When the census was taken on 31st March 1901, John Innes senior, his wife Ellen and their eldest son, John Weaver Innes, were recorded at 36 Beaconsfield Villas, Preston, Brighton. On the census return, John Weaver Innes, an unmarried man of 38, is described as a "Photographer (Employer)", yet by this date he had given up his interest in the photographic studio at 36 Goldstone Villas, Hove.

[ABOVE] The trade plate of  John Weaver Innes of The Studio, 36 Goldstone Villas, Hove (c1900).

[ABOVE] A label taken from the reverse of a cabinet portrait produced by John Weaver Innes of 36 Goldstone Villas, Hove (c1900).

[ABOVE] A recent photograph of 36 Goldstone Villas, Hove (2005). This building was used continuously as a photographic portrait studio between 1878 and 1914. Originally owned by Henry Joseph Spink, the Goldstone Villa studio was taken over by Frank Houghton Berry around 1897. The studio was sold to John Weaver Innes  in 1900.

[ABOVE] The announcement of the dissolution of the business partnership between John Weaver Innes  and Henry Bate "carrying on business as Photographers at Hove, in the county of Sussex, under the style or firm of Innes and Bate", as published in The London Gazette on 31st May 1901. John Weaver Innes  had been joined by photographer Henry Bate (born 1863, London) at 36 Goldstone Villas, Hove, at the end of 1900. The partnership of Innes & Bates was dissolved by mutual consent on 25th March 1901.

 

Cabinet Portaits by John Weaver Innes of Hove

[ABOVE] A cabinet card portrait of a young woman, photographed by John Weaver Innes of Hove (c1899).

[ABOVE] A cabinet card portrait of a young woman, photographed by John Weaver Innes of Hove (c1899).

 

John Weaver Innes - Photographer in Davigdor Road, Hove

By 1905, John Weaver Innes had established a photographic studio in Davigdor Road on Hove's Wick estate. It appears that J. Weaver Innes' parents, John Innes senior and Mrs Ellen Jane Innes, had moved from Beaconsfield Villas in the Preston district of Brighton to a house called "Alfrada" in Goldsmid Road, Hove. The Innes family had moved to Goldsmid Road at a time when this part of the Wick estate was being developed for residential housing. Within a few years, the western end of Goldsmid Road had been absorbed by Davigdor Road. In 1904, the studio address of John Weaver Innes was given as "Alfrada", Goldsmid Road, Hove, but by the time Kelly's Brighton Street Directory was published in 1905, John Weaver Innes was being listed as a photographer at "Alfrada", Davigdor Road, Hove. The trades section of the 1907 edition of Kelly's Directory of Sussex records John Weaver Innes as a photographer at 7 Davigdor Road, Hove. The location of John Weaver Innes' photographic studio had remained constant at a site between Osmond Road and Julian Road to the west of Goldsmid Road, but rapid housing development in the area had meant that the Hove photographer's studio address had to be changed three times between 1904 and 1907.

John Weaver Innes was in business as a photographer at his parent's house in Goldsmid/Davigdor Road between 1904 and 1915. Early in 1911, the photographer's father, John Innes senior, died in Hove at the age of 72. When the census was taken on 2nd April 1911, John Weaver Innes was recorded at 7 Davigdor Road, Hove with his seventy-six year old mother Mrs Ellen Jane Innes and her companion and servant, Helen Hoath. At the time of the 1911 census, John Weaver Innes was a forty-eight year old bachelor, working as a photographer at his mother's house in Davigdor Road. During the 3rd Quarter of 1912, John Weaver Innes' mother, Mrs Ellen Jane Innes died at the age 77. The following year, fifty year old John Weaver Innes married his late mother's companion Helen Hoath, who was then probably in her thirties. [The marriage of John Weaver Innes and Helen Hoath was registered in West Sussex district of East Grinstead during the 4th Quarter of 1913].

John Weaver Innes probably inherited his late mother's house at 7 Davigdor Road, Hove and he continued to operate as a photographer at this address until 1915.

John Weaver Innes died in Hove during the First Quarter of 1928 at the age of 65.

[ABOVE] The photographer John Weaver Innes (marked by a red dot) recorded at "Alfrada", Goldsmid Road, Hove, in Pike's Directory of Brighton & Hove published in 1905. Henry Bate, John W. Innes' former business partner, is listed as a photographer at 36 Goldstone Villas, Hove.

[ABOVE] The photographer John Weaver Innes recorded at 7 Davigdor Road, Hove, in Pike's Directory of Brighton & Hove published in 1909. Henry Bate, John W. Innes' former business partner, is still listed as a photographer at 36 Goldstone Villas, Hove.
 

John Weaver Innes - Photographer in Davigdor Road, Hove between 1905 and 1915

[ABOVE] An Edwardian map of the St Ann's Well Gardens district of Hove, showing Davigdor Road to the north of The Chalybeate Spring in the gardens on the Wick estate, which in the 19th and early 20th century belonged to the Goldsmid family. The financier and philanthropist Sir Isaac Lyon Goldsmid (1778-1859) purchased land on the Wick estate in 1830. Sir Isaac Lyon Goldsmid made his home at Wick Lodge and created the gardens to the north of Furze Hill. Originally known as The Wick gardens, the parkland around the Chalybeate spring was re-named St Ann's Well Gardens towards the end of the 19th century. When the Wick estate was developed into a residential housing area at the end of the 19th century, the roads and streets were named after members of the influential Goldsmid family who owned the Wick estate. Goldsmid Road, which had been laid out in the 1840s, was named after Sir Isaac Lyon Goldsmid (1778-1859) and Davigdor Road was named after Sir Isaac's daughter and son-in-law, Rachel and Solomon D'avigdor Goldsmid. Osmond Road derived from Sir Osmond D'avigdor Goldsmid (1877-1940), the great grandson of Sir Isaac Lyon Goldsmid and Julian Road was named after Sir Isaac's grandson Sir Julian Goldsmid (1838-1896). The Hove photographer John Weaver Innes operated from No. 7 Davigdor Road [marked by a red dot on the map] which was located between Osmond Road and Julian Road.

[BELOW] The entry for the photographer John Weaver Innes in Kelly's 1905 Brighton Street Directory

[BELOW] The entry for the photographer John Weaver Innes in Kelly's 1915 Brighton Street Directory

[RIGHT] Around 1905 the north side of Goldsmid Road to the east of Osmond Road was absorbed by Davigdor Road. By 1906, the properties on the north side of Davigdor Road were given house numbers. The studio of  photographer John Weaver Innes, previously known by the house name of "Alfrada" became No. 7 Davigdor Road.

[ABOVE] The Hove photographer John Weaver Innes recorded at No. 7 Davigdor Road (previously known by the house name of "Alfrada").

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

George Amos JOHNS